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Check showtimes to see when Amanpour is on CNN where you are. Or watch online.

And now your feedback:

December 28th, 2009
05:38 PM ET
Robert Mugabe says sanctions against his country are 'unjustifiable.'
Robert Mugabe says sanctions against his country are 'unjustifiable.'

The interview with Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe caused controversy among the vast majority of viewers.  Most expressed disappointment over Mugabe’s “arrogance and blatant lies” during the interview and noted his “resistance” to helping the country of Zimbabwe.  Most had very strong adjectives for Mr. Mugabe that highlighted the indignation felt toward the “false promises” and “lack of action”  he had expressed, according to the audience.  Many viewers thanked Amanpour for a “great interview” and for holding Mugabe accountable, although “one thing was clear”, some stated, and that was that “Mugabe could not be trusted.”

Below, you will see some opinions from viewers like yourself:

CNN MAILBOX

  • Dear Christiane

Jolly well done with your interview of Mugabe this evening.

Your questions concerned real issues; and he squirmed like blazes to slither out of it. Even though he would not admit to any of his wrong-doings, your audience was left with the certainty that this man cannot be trusted or believed.

In the southern part of Africa the folks know very well who and what he is. The problem is that he is up 'close-and-personal' with many in the senior leadership; having each other by the 'short-and-curlies'. Each one knows the other's secrets, and nobody would talk; because this would ignite a fire on own turf.

There is one area which needs a measure of investigation, which could blow it all wide open. Over the past ten (or more) years I've often watched and listened to this man, with particular reference to his highly irrational and senseless statements. In it all I've seen a clear (and remarkable) resemblance (a carbon copy) of a man who had the world's attention 60 – 70 yrs ago, i.e., Adolf Hitler.

In the early 30's Hitler became a hero because he came through with amazing projects which created jobs for the German population, so that they could have a regular plate of food, when the rest of the world was starving. Therefore, it was no surprise that he became the Head of State of Germany. However, as time went by, a situation developed which was described in great detail in a documentary on Discovery or the History Channel (or the like). [You wouldn't have a problem tracking and locating that documentary]

Hitler started showing irrational behavioral patterns. His personal physician wrote to Hitlers aide de camp  (I think it was Goebels) to inform him that Hitler suffered a certain disease which (if left untreated) attacks and causes damage to the spinal cord, and then moves-on to the brain.  The physician stated that this caused the increasing irrational and senseless behaviour (and decision-making) and he predicted that by 1946 Hitler would go completely 'over-the-edge'.  The rest is history, i.e., Hitler did not make it to 1946.

Question: Is there a Journalist/Reporter who would love to research President Mugabe's health record?

Best regards, and keep-up your great work.

Leon


  • Unfortunately you tried giving mugabe a voice. He is dead politically, pls let him remain so. You heard his rant, and obviously he is disconected from everything around him.As Africans we are ashamed of Him.

From: bada – francis, Nigeria

Felix Otchere Boateng

He is hero to those who benefits from his worse form of governance, God have mercy on his soul

FULL POST


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And now your feedback:

December 22nd, 2009
02:38 AM ET
Christiane - all ears for the feedback.
Christiane – all ears for the feedback.

Feedback was light and the topic that most viewers discussed was Climate Change.  Alarm over the threat that climate change represents to Alaska was present.  Some felt climate change had a political association and was a “government tactic” to distract people from the “real issues”, while others expressed compassion for those having to bear the harsh weather conditions.

Below, you will see some opinions from viewers like yourself:

Raul E. Lorenzana

Look lake Atitlan in Guatemala , we have a BIG problem too

John Ray Nagas

We really must take action fast!

Julie Raymond

Thank you for covering this.

Meher Zaidi

it is so sad that there are so many people in the mountains and their precious ,rich lives will be affected by the climate change. Here ,in Pakistan also we have mountains and valleys where so many wonderful cultures and peoples survive.We have to record the climate changes and the affects on thier lives in our part of Himalayas too.This is a research in sociology and human anthropology which social scientists ought to encourage.Maybe the UNESCO people will link this debate .

FULL POST


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Women in journalism, in danger and in the grave:

December 18th, 2009
06:24 PM ET
Christiane Amanpour standing in a graveyard in Rwanda for her documentary 'Scream Bloody Murder'
Christiane Amanpour standing in a graveyard in Rwanda for her documentary 'Scream Bloody Murder'

By Vladimir Duthiers; Production Assistant, AMANPOUR.

On November 25, the Committee to Protect Journalist honored five journalists with its 2009 International Press Freedom Awards in a ceremony highlighting the plight of journalists in danger zones such as Somalia, China, Sri Lanka, Azerbaijan and most recently, the Philippines, where thirty journalists were killed in the province of Maguindanao. Christiane, who sits on the CPJ board, hosted the event at the Waldorf Astoria in New York.

Among the awardees of the CPJ’s 2009 International Press Freedom Awards was Eynulla Fatullayev, founder and editor-in-chief of Realny Azerbaijan, J.S. Tissainayagam, editor of the news web site OutreachSL and a columnist for the English-language Sri Lankan Sunday Times, Mustafa Haji Abdinur, Somalia correspondent for Agence France-Presse and editor-in-chief of the independent radio station Radio Simba, and Naziha Réjiba, editor of the Tunisia based independent online news journal Kalima. The CPJ also presented the Burton Benjamin Memorial Award to the two-time Pulitzer Prize winning New York Times journalist, Anthony Lewis. The award is given in recognition of a lifetime of distinguished achievement in the cause of press freedom

For me, the sight of Miss Réjiba at the podium was especially moving and served as a personal source of inspiration around the issue of the Internet’s emerging role in press freedom and those that seek to suppress it. While attempting to report on recent elections in her home country of Tunisia, Réjiba said she faced “a relentless and vicious campaign” waged by her government. She added, reporters’ movements “have been restricted; others have been beaten, abducted, subjected to politicized trials, imprisoned, or placed under constant surveillance.”

FULL POST


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When Tom Met Harry:

December 18th, 2009
05:05 PM ET
Sr. Writer Tom Evans
Sr. Writer Tom Evans

Our Sr. Writer Meets His Father’s Former Editor

By Tom Evans, CNN

It’s not every day that a journalist has the good fortune to meet a man who has inspired not only his own generation but also his father’s. That’s exactly what happened to me this week when I met Sir Harry Evans, who was editor of London’s Sunday Times for 14 years from 1967 and editor of The Times for one year until he abruptly resigned in 1982 after tensions with its new proprietor Rupert Murdoch.

More than a quarter century after his resignation, Sir Harry and his wife Tina Brown, an accomplished journalist and editor in her own right, came to our New York studios to talk with Christiane Amanpour about old media, new media, and what’s next in a world where newspapers in the U.S. and other countries are shedding thousands of jobs and news web sites are gaining popularity and influence.

It was a very different era for newspapers when my father Peter Evans, a journalist on The Times, worked for Sir Harry back in the early 1980’s. My father was the newspaper’s Home Affairs Correspondent, covering issues such as race relations, immigration, police and prisons. Here’s what my father told me this week about his recollections of Sir Harry.

“He was the only editor who had ever given me a chance to correct my own copy.  I loved his hands-on approach. He cared for his writers but was demanding in his quality. Of the seven editors I worked for, he had most intuition. He knew how to take the germ of an idea and develop it, without distortion. His news sense was supreme.”

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And now your feedback:

December 18th, 2009
02:39 PM ET

Christiane - all ears for the feedback.
Christiane – all ears for the feedback.

Ideas of development in Iraq and Afghanistan continued to cause waves among most viewers.  Most felt the terrorism and violence in the Middle East was part of a “big terrorism plot all around the world.”  Others thought that opening dialogue among decision makers could make a big difference in the end-result.  Overall, viewers stated their ideas based on their cultural beliefs but with one goal in mind, peace.

Below, you will see some opinions from viewers like yourself.

CNN MAILBOX

Hello Christiane

If the Afghans were able to repel the Soviets what makes America think they can do better?  Is there a strategy and is it working?

LADaniel

Paul Dexter A. Capiral

Two problems of the world today. Global Warming and Terror Attacks. Hope the world survive... Peace!!!

Bill McNichols

where is the one prominent muslim imam or leader who will decree that terrorism is sinful & forbidden?

FULL POST


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Tom's Take

December 18th, 2009
02:37 PM ET
Sr. Writer Tom Evans
Sr. Writer Tom Evans

On AMANPOUR. today, two people with legendary careers in newspapers and publishing share their stories with Christiane. Sir Harold Evans was the editor of the UK’s prestigious Sunday Times and The Times, revolutionizing British journalism by bringing to light many of the most important stories of our time. Tina Brown achieved fame as the first female editor of the New Yorker and Editor-in-Chief of Vanity Fair. Now she is making her mark on the web with Daily Beast. In their FIRST joint interview ever, the powerhouse couple sit down to talk about their life together and the future of the craft they helped shape. We are also paying attention to some other important stories. Here are some perspectives on some headlines in the news right now.

Tom Evans
Sr. Writer, AMANPOUR.

PAKISTAN – Will instability in Pakistan hinder the fight against terrorism?

- new bomb blast, in northwest Pakistan, kills 12 people outside a police compound in the city of Timargarah

- bombing the latest in a series of recent attacks in Pakistan that have killed hundreds of people

- new suspected U.S. drone strike in North Waziristan, Pakistan kills at least three people, day after two other attacks left 15 dead in the same area

- Pakistani Supreme Court strikes down an amnesty that had protected thousands of politicians and officials from corruption charges, raising possibility of new political and legal turmoil as opposition calls for ouster of President Asif Ali Zardari

QUESTION: Will legal and political challenges against government distract it from its offensive against the Taliban?

FULL POST


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Sri Lankan diplomat denies abuses of Tamils

December 16th, 2009
05:55 PM ET

By: Tom Evans; Sr. Writer, AMANPOUR.

A top Sri Lankan diplomat Monday strongly rejected charges his government is abusing human rights of members of the country's minority Tamil community in refugee camps after the country's quarter-century-long civil war.

In an interview with CNN's Christiane Amanpour, Palitha Kohona, the Sri Lankan Ambassador to the United Nations, insisted his government treated hundreds of thousands of refugees humanely after the war ended in May.

Human rights groups and Western governments, though, strongly criticized conditions in the camps, saying the conditions amounted to an illegal form of collective punishment.

"It's only six months after the war ended. In May, we had over 300,000 people pouring into camps, which were run by the government in order to feed the people, provide them with shelter, and to provide them with health care," Kohona said. "Now almost 60 percent or maybe even 70 percent have returned to their own homes. At the end of last week, there were only about 114,000 still remaining in the camps."

The 26-year-long civil war, one of Asia's longest-running insurgencies, ended with a crushing military victory by the government.

FULL POST


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Al Qaeda in Iraq 'shifting its tactics'

December 16th, 2009
03:12 PM ET

By Tom Evans; Sr. Writer, AMANPOUR.

The former U.S. ambassador to Iraq, Ryan Crocker, blames al Qaeda for Tuesday's coordinated bomb attacks in Iraq, saying al Qaeda is now targeting the Iraqi government.

The bombings - the latest in a series of attacks in Iraq - killed eight people.

Calling al Qaeda in Iraq a "very deadly adversary," Crocker said in an interview with CNN's Christiane Amanpour that al Qaeda was working "to shake popular confidence in the (Iraqi) government, particularly as we move toward elections."

In Tuesday's attacks, insurgents exploded three car bombs close to heavily guarded sites in the Baghdad city center near the fortified "Green Zone" that houses Iraqi government buildings and the U.S. embassy. Four people were killed and 14 others were injured. In the volatile northern city of Mosul, four people were killed in three bombings.

"It's pretty clear to me that the architect is al Qaeda in Iraq," Crocker told Amanpour. FULL POST


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My Daughter The Terrorist:

December 14th, 2009
12:56 PM ET

By Beate Arnestad

Editor's note: Below is a compelling blog post that looks at the 26-year long civil war in Sri Lanka from the perspective of a filmmaker who met two young Tamil women planning to be suicide bombers. We do not know for sure what happened to the two women she interviewed, though there is a report both survived the war. We know even less about most of the suicide bombers' victims, many of them possibly innocent civilians from the Sinhalese majority in Sri Lanka. What we do know is that the war is finally over, after the loss of more than 70,000 lives and the displacement of hundreds of thousands of people.

Filmmaker Beate Arnestad with the mother of Darshika – a young woman who joined the Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka.
Filmmaker Beate Arnestad with the mother of Darshika – a young woman who joined the Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka.

For a few years I lived in paradise: in a tropical environment on an island called Sri Lanka. Every morning I woke up in my four-post bed in Colombo –watching the dawn creeping in through my mosquito net and listening to the awakening sounds of all the tropical birds greeting a new day. I had moved to Sri Lanka from Norway because my husband had been posted there.

But paradise was not perfect. There were many slum areas and stray dogs eating garbage. There were countless beggars, dirty street children and pollution. There was also an unavoidable military presence.

There was a ceasefire in effect, but the city was not back to normal. Every major street was patrolled by heavily armed soldiers. "What do they fear?" I asked.

The reply was always the same: "The terrorists, the Black Tigers, these crazy suicide bombers."

I found there was very little written on the group except that they had begun operations in 1987, that about 30% were believed to be female, and that their most famous action was the murder of Rajiv Gandhi in 1991. Therefore, I decided to make a documentary film and find out more about this group.

I was told that my chances of success were poor, and that the Tamil rebels, the LTTE, lived in utmost secrecy in the jungle of the guerrilla-controlled areas in the north. Nobody from the outside world could get in touch with them, but somehow I managed.

I recall at one military checkpoint, an inspector told me, "Madam, I wouldn't advise you to leave the government controlled area. On the other side, there is no one to protect you."

"I will be fine," I said with a smile.

FULL POST


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Webcast: 'My Daugther The Terrorist'

December 14th, 2009
12:53 PM ET

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