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What Haiti needs now – a Future

January 25th, 2010
11:14 PM ET
Christiane at the rubble of the U.N.'s  Headquarters in Haiti
Christiane at the rubble of the U.N.'s  Headquarters in Haiti

By Christiane Amanpour

In Haiti, the emergency phase is still in full swing. Yes, many official rescue efforts have been called off. But the truth is that international rescue crews are still being called out when there's a clue that somebody might be alive under the rubble.

Because of the miraculous rescue of a 24-year-old man on Saturday night, they are not giving up. Hope does diminish with each day, but the rescues haven’t ceased. So they may even pull more people out. I think that gives tremendous hope not just to people here in Port-au-Prince but to people everywhere.

This Sunday, we saw Mass and religious services here and around the country. This is a powerfully religious country. So many Haitians were not just mourning the family and friends they lost, but giving thanks for the survival of friends who made it through and for the resilience and resolve they have shown throughout this incredible crisis.

And now, at last, the aid pipeline is gradually widening and more food and water is gradually getting to people who need it. It’s still not perfect, but it is slowly becoming a much more organized distribution.

We’ve seen signs of rebuilding that will allow Haitians to return to their homes. And the U.N. is conscious that it needs to help put people to work. That will help build a sense of security here - just paying people, so they can keep body and soul together.

One of the U.N.’s plans is to pay people $3 a day to start collecting rubble and get it out of the streets. That might not sound like much, but it's more than the $1 a day most people exist on here in Haiti. Now they can start to get the streets back to normal.

And at the same time, emergency officials want people to get out of the capital city to go see family around the country, whose communities might have withstood the earthquake better than this ravaged city has. We're seeing people leaving town by whatever means they can find – on busses, bicycles, motorbikes, and in cars.

It’s important to know that not all of Haiti has been destroyed. The greatest damage has occurred in this capital city and parts of Jacmel – a cultural capital on the southern Caribbean coast. Leogane, another city close to Jacmel, was also hit hard, and people there are also moving to the countryside.

Many Haitians would like to leave the country altogether. The United States has made it clear in radio broadcasts here in Haiti, in aerial broadcasts from its huge C-130 transport jets, that they are not allowing illegal immigrants to enter the United States. So without a visa, Haitians are being told, “do not come” – you’ll be repatriated. This sounds harsh, but the United States says it is focusing its help inside Haiti, and doesn’t want people to perish trying to cross the high seas.

Still, we see long lines by the immigration offices, by the passport offices, people camping out by the U.S. embassy, the Canadian embassy – all, hoping to leave. All hoping for a future.


Filed under:  1 • Haiti
soundoff (112 Responses)
  1. Francine Jewett

    I think paying people to work is a great idea. I see some markets setting up and cash would make a huge difference. I wish we could get some kind of mass shipment of decent tents at least though., Seeing people camping on golf course with no real security is awful. I wonder how long it will take to get the people into some reasonably decent housing.

    I heard the story on CNN today of the the family that was putting two kid through college and now are living in a tent. Sort of a tent. And have nothing,

    If Gap factory is back up and runnning, wish they would sell some Save Haiti t-shirts in US for fundraiser.
    Keep the news coming. They need to police tent cities better!!!!

    January 26, 2010 at 1:12 am | Reply
  2. Tish

    This makes sense. Most people don't want a hand-out, they want a hand up. Human beings want something they can take pride in, and most of all, they need something to temporarily take their minds off of what just occurred, for sanity's sake. Work will do that and more, if Ms. Amanpour's take on the avg. Haitian salary is any indication. I wholeheartedly endorse the UN's decision.

    January 26, 2010 at 2:28 am | Reply
  3. christanique

    i would love to help haiti again i hope thay are felled with god love you all love christanique

    10 years old

    January 26, 2010 at 2:31 am | Reply
  4. TyHouston

    Haiti didn't have a future to begin with.

    Where is the rest of their people, their island? Their food and medical stores? Know where? Ignoring the problem, but bet some outsiders are hopping cars to get free food and money when the moron US rolls in.

    Bet most the rioters don't live in Port De prince either. Outsiders come to drool and loot in lawlessness.

    Like Kateria and NO.

    January 26, 2010 at 2:42 am | Reply
  5. Linda Ashley

    Christiane,
    I think network and cable news makes the Haiti rescue effort look like it's all (well, mostly) about the US. While I do NOT want to, in any way, disparage the efforts and donations of generous and compassionate Americans, I want to know who else is showing up. Occasionally, I hear the mention of this rescue team or that doctor from some other country, I want to know what other governments are helping, what countries are raising $60 million dollars with telethons, where is equipment coming from, whose ships are off shore, whose planes are bringing supplies, which countries are willing to take orphans and refugees, etc. I'd like to see the news coverage reflect, what I hope, is a real international effort. And, I don't mean UN efforts-which seem to me mostly US funded and staffed. Please give us this info. Many of my friends have expressed an interest in this. What a sorrowful situation! I want to know if other nations are seriously showing up! Linda Ashley

    January 26, 2010 at 3:20 am | Reply
  6. Joe

    Ms. Amanpour,

    Why hasn't US and other countries request the Haitian Governmennt allow the childern in need be air evacuated to willing nations ? They can take these kids in and place them in safe agencies all over the world. They'll have Medical, safety and educational needs met. These childern will not have else things for many years as is in Haiti . This would be temporary 2-4 years to help the Haitian Nation and refief agencies care for the adults and teenage childern left in Haiti . This will allow the younger childern the care they need . (24hr supervision and care) US has done this for Vietnamese in 70's all ages, Cubans in 50's 60's and 80's.

    January 26, 2010 at 3:35 am | Reply
  7. vinegrower

    How many middle eastern countries are helping in Haiti ? Has the taliban donated a relief aid to Haiti ?

    January 26, 2010 at 3:53 am | Reply
  8. Scott

    Let's hope the US can stick to it's guns on the immigration issue. It may sound harsh but the Hatiains should stay and rebuild their cities/country in to one of their liking. Merely changing their location will not solve anything nor bring them a better life.

    January 26, 2010 at 4:10 am | Reply
  9. Patricia Dupuis

    I am waiting to see who is going to run the building up of Haiti before I give my second donation. Too much money seems to disappear and does not help the people that need it.

    January 26, 2010 at 4:19 am | Reply
  10. Mari

    Linda Ashley – in response to your question about who else is helping out...Canadian telethons (one French, one English) raised over $20 million for Haiti on the same night as the US telethons. Before you think that doesn't sound like much – remember the Canadian population is one-tenth that of the US. So per capita that is more than three times what the US telethon raised. Would be the equivalent of the US having raised $200 million with similar per capita donations. I only point that out to clarify that there was a tremendous response from a country with a relatively small population. I'm not intending that to be critical of the US per capita response in any way. All fundraising efforts are important and the US has been very generous in helping Haiti.

    For more information on the Canadian telethons see

    http://www.cbc.ca/arts/tv/story/2010/01/25/telethon-fundraising.html

    January 26, 2010 at 4:37 am | Reply
  11. LIONEL B.

    The U.S. government is still wary of allowing Haitians to come to the U.S. Their worse fear is a wholesale invasion of boat people coming to Florida. Surely, among all of this suffering the granting of temporary visas should be granted to those Haitians with family in the U.S. and Canada. The U.S. has a long history of intervention in the Caribbean and in Haiti. The poverty that exists today in Haiti was caused in part by American support of dictators like Papa and Baby Doc Duvalier. The paying of able-bodied workers three dollars a day for the clearing of debris is a short term temporary relief measure. The whole reconstruction of the infrastructure of Haiti needs to be contemplated. Such a project will take several years at the cost of billions of dollar. More importantly, Haiti cannot be repaired as before the earthquake. What CNN has clearly shown to the world is the level of dysfunction that existed in Haiti before the earthquake. The few functioning institutions that existed then could barely meet the demands of the Haitian people. A new Haiti needs to be rebuilt from the ground up. One that will serve the people of Haiti instead of its predatory elite. The future of the Haitian people should be decided by the people of Haiti themselves.

    January 26, 2010 at 4:45 am | Reply
  12. Angela

    Spoiled Americans please do not shame us all with your critisism of other nations. Haiti to no fault of its own has suffered at natures hands. These are not rats that should drown on this horrible island, these are people and their sophisticated brains tell them to flee. Tell me where would you flee if you were a HUMAN living in Hell on earth?? It is cruel to force Humans to stay in those deplorable conditions. Now sleep well in your comfortable home that we all got on the backs of other poor nations suffering and face a new reality.

    January 26, 2010 at 4:46 am | Reply
  13. Arlene

    Haiti lost many Government buildings and important people Can you find out what's happening? The courts, banks, trade, military?

    January 26, 2010 at 4:48 am | Reply
  14. Grace

    The US will need to establish long-term commitments now in leading Haiti's development and who knows how long it's going to take. Might as well annex the country and make it a US territory.

    January 26, 2010 at 4:48 am | Reply
  15. johnny

    don't forget Haiti always votes against the United States in the U.N. against our embargo with socialist Cuba. They should stick to their own friends like Fidel and Hugo Chavez for help

    January 26, 2010 at 5:01 am | Reply
  16. Diogenese

    What Haiti needs now is a government that would have had better stockpiles after spending the $3B in aid they receiced from the US in the past 10 years. Aid should be tied to planning like the Ant in the Ant and Grasshopper fable. If you give a man a fish you feed him for one day and waste a fish. If you make him learn to fish or starve you end up with either a robust Island of free and empty island for hard working people to populate. I suppose it is just like the welfare state here in the USA.
    Oh and building codes would be nice as well so they do not stack poured cement floors on unreinforced cinder block walls.

    January 26, 2010 at 5:06 am | Reply
  17. Ghislaine Chassagne

    On behalf of the Haitian people, THANK YOU Christiane and CNN for your concern and your great coverage concerning the January 12th, earthquake in Haiti.
    To those who know their history, (HAITI was there for the US) Thank you for your support.

    January 26, 2010 at 5:12 am | Reply
  18. K. Martin

    Why should we trust that the US, Canada, France and the IMF would be interested in helping Haiti for the Haitians, they haven't in the pass. What does Haiti have that they could want.

    January 26, 2010 at 5:21 am | Reply
  19. margarita dimanas

    hang in there we will help allof you even god will.

    January 26, 2010 at 5:22 am | Reply
  20. Mike

    "huge C-130 transport jets"?

    It is a transport, it isn't a jet (those four large spinning things are called propellers), and it might be "big" but "huge" it isn't. The thing has been in production since 1957 and has been outclassed by the C-141 (now retired), the C-5A (it is "huge"), and the C-17. All three of these are "jets".

    Why do I point all this out? If I can't trust you to get facts I know right, why should I assume you are any more careful about the rest of your report?

    January 26, 2010 at 5:52 am | Reply
  21. Jiggy Garcia

    Why is it, the Archbishop was given a "fancy" funeral with the President and his wife in attendance, were as all the other "citizens" who died in the earthquake are left to chance and rot all over the city ?

    January 26, 2010 at 5:53 am | Reply
  22. Carol Gag

    To Linda Ashley,
    Our Plain Dealer Newspaper here in Cleveland Ohio has just quoted most of the countries that have donated money, troops, Drs and medical supplies, as well as planes carrying food, tents. & WATER.

    So far the US and Canada have given the most at $130,Million.The US has sent 12,000 Military Personnel, Several Navy ships, with Hospitals on board. Seven Cargo planes, 49 Helicopters. Much more as each day passes. So much more is needed. This is the worst tragedy in decades.
    Most of the countries are sending some kind of relief.

    China has been very generous $4.2 Million as well as a 60 member rescue team with rescue specialists with sniffer dogs. It just goes on and on.

    check you local paper on line or CNN on line.

    My biggest concern is for the small babies & children that have nobody to care for them now. WE all need to pray for all the victims in Haiti and their families. Carol Gag

    A BIG THANK YOU TO ANDERSON COOPER OF CNN FOR KEEPING THEM HONEST. SOMEONE NEEDS TO DO THIS. I AM GLAD THAT YOU ARE THE CHOSEN ONE.
    THANKS FOR ALL THE WONDERFUL COVERAGE YOU HAVE GIVEN SINCE THIS FIRST STARTED. A JOB WELL DONE. I WISH I COULD GO THERE AND HOLD THOSE BABIES. AND THE LITTLE CHILDREN.

    January 26, 2010 at 5:54 am | Reply
  23. Carol Gag

    PLEASE
    CAN'T SOMEBODY KEEP CHECKING OUT THE FALLEN "MONTANA HOTEL" FOR THOSE AMERICAN GIRLS THAT WENT THERE TO HELP OUT THE "SAVE THE CHILDREN " ORPHANAGE???

    I HEARD THEIR FATHERS AND MOTHERS ON CNN AND MY HEART JUST BROKE FOR THEM. I HOPE THEY CAN BE FOUND. AND SOON.
    THEY PLEADED WITH LARRY KING ALSO TO HELP THEM. IS THERE ANYTHING else THAT CAN BE DONE ?

    I PRAY FOR THEM AND THEIR FAMILIES. EACH AND EVERY ONE OF THEM. BEST WISHES TO ALL THAT HAVE HELPED. CAROL Gag.
    MAY GOD BLESS THEM AND KEEP THEM ALL SAFE.

    January 26, 2010 at 5:59 am | Reply
  24. Gregg

    How are they preparing the people and shelter for hurricane season?

    January 26, 2010 at 6:00 am | Reply
  25. Elaine

    I would like CNN and other news organizations to continue their excellent coverage with stories as to who is actually in charge of Haiti at the present time? Is it the UN, the Haitian government or envoys sent by the U.S. government who will be deciding what gets done first, and more importantly, how will all the money collected through telethons, and through other relief agencies,how are these funds igoing to be spent in order to rebuild Haiti? Who will have control and say as to what gets done with all these donations? Obviously, the hope is that money does not go to waste, that news agencies will be able to find out how some of these donations will be used to rebuild this country. It is impossible to figure out who is really "calling the shots" in Haiti right now. Thanks for all of your hard work and interest.

    January 26, 2010 at 6:04 am | Reply
  26. debbie

    Such interesting comments.
    – Where is the rest of Haiti? As the poorest nation in the world for how many years now, they've already been struggling to survive, so whatever resources they may have to offer their countrymen isn't enough to cause the media to blink. Remember, even the capital building collapsed! This comment is like having outrage against people in ICU for not crawling over to ER to give blood to the incoming.
    – Why has it been primarily the US that has been giving support? Like it or not, it's because the US culture was built upon Christian principles of sanctity of life, holding to the "truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." Though I'd be the last one to call the US a Christian nation today, I sure am glad that we were built to be such, manifest now in such beautiful acts of compassion and sacrifice, such as the response to Haiti's disaster, 9/11, disabled rights and therapy, protected classes, and the list goes on.
    – I'm proud to be an American, and my family has chosen to do our part in this horrible event. It's the least we can do for our human brothers and sisters.

    January 26, 2010 at 6:34 am | Reply
  27. stopthat

    TyHouston: You are disturbingly ignorant. Please educate yourself before you say anything else. When you don't even know the name of the Haitian capital or the name of the hurricane that hit New Orleans, you pretty much lose your right to make any kind of comment on either situation.

    Vinegrower: And that has exactly WHAT to do with anything? Yeah, I thought not.

    January 26, 2010 at 7:24 am | Reply
  28. desert voice

    What Haiti needs is that some U.S. corporations move there right now, from China. We already helped China enough! Now lets do the same for Haiti. The Haitian people is intelligent and ready to work. They can manufacture the same clothing items and toys that are now being manufactured in China. They can produce sneakers for Nike at much lesser cost. They can manufacture building materials on their soil, which is the cheapest way to rebuilt their capital. The capital ought to be built away from where the tectonic plates meet. Port-au-Prince can still remain a powerful commercial and tourist center. I call on U.S. corporations to make the announcement on their relocation to Haiti now when people need hope!

    January 26, 2010 at 10:51 am | Reply
  29. Ryan

    vinegrower is ignorant and racist. Arab countries have poured financial and economic assistance into Haiti since the earthquake (Dubai and the UAE donated over $10,000,000 thus far and Princess Haya of Dubai (of Palestinian origin) is currently in Port au Prince leading the humanitarian mission for the Arab League. Arab countries are always the first to help struggling countries despite the rest of world's unwillingness to give the Middle East the only thing they desire, which is peace and justice.

    And please study a bit od geography- the Taliban is from Afghanistan which is a country 1,000 miles away from the Middle East (and it's not remotely Arab in any way). Sometimes I'm ashamed to be American.. God and Allah bless Haiti.

    January 26, 2010 at 10:55 am | Reply
  30. frank

    Amanpour i feal bad for the haiti people, how about our people, you know the USA, or maybe you forgot, kids going to bed without no food, no heat in the house, remember catrina, all this help going to HAITI, what about us . I know , Iknow;; you cant remember.

    January 26, 2010 at 11:27 am | Reply
  31. skippy

    please bring people's attention to http://www.physiciansforpeace.org they need help rounding up crutches and prosthetics to help solve an urgent need that the Haitians have as a result ot this disaster!

    great reporting from CNN team makes the onlookers feel a part of the action

    January 26, 2010 at 11:37 am | Reply
  32. Joe Strother

    Looking at the news on the web there are two stories that stick out, housing industry is down and Haiti people need homes, why not connect the two dots. Take the people here out of work and pay for them to go to Haiti and build houses there. Temporary housing could be solved easily enough before the rains start by using what is available, shipping containers. The big containers that are used to ship things on boats can be converted to temporary housing and would be earthquake proof too. I've seen stories before where people have done this and put several together to make a complete house. These containers are sitting around docks everywhere empty.

    January 26, 2010 at 12:15 pm | Reply
  33. Stan

    Vinegrower : Jordan and Iran have donated millions to Haiti

    January 26, 2010 at 1:03 pm | Reply
  34. Maria Martinez

    The idea of sending help around the country is the best news I have heard today. They too need all thehelp they can get. They might not suffer much because of the earthquake, but they suffering started long before that. If people from the capital is moving in, there will be less to hold on to. My parish is doing all they can do to help, but it is not enough. Thanks,

    January 26, 2010 at 1:09 pm | Reply
  35. Veronica Pickard

    While Haiti suffers, people like us talk and exclaim in horror and sympathy. Today I saw a headline, " 7 year old raises 12 million for Haiti" . If a 7 year old can take it apon him/herself to just do it, so should we all. Just do it. I am starting now.

    January 26, 2010 at 1:14 pm | Reply
  36. UHuman

    Ms. Amanpour,

    I am just curious, wasn't the whole island stable and happy before 1492 with more than 1 million habitants ? The Tainos and Arawaks natives of Hispaniola, were'nt they fed and stable with agriculture, fishing, hunting, their own religious and social rites ? Wasn't the island's forestry intact with species of rare woods and the top soil rich and fertile.

    Who made this island the pesthole that it has become and imported all these folks there that are not only facing death and destruction ?

    These questions and the responsibility need to be made out plain and simple, and these are the people who should be made to clean up this mess.

    The first priority in my mind is children, who are totally innocent, and suffer pain very intensely. They have a right to life, and freedom that Haiti's escapees have for so long fought to eke out of this god forsaken planet.

    I am ashamed to call myself human.

    January 26, 2010 at 1:28 pm | Reply
  37. MILFORT MARC

    Wow CNN, Amanpour Great Job, one great ideal i am in germany the german government have a great way of building walls on the highway were their used rocks only inside a metal case, that will be a great way for Haiti to used most of the debris which are cement brick , to build most of the walls that will need to be build.

    And once again Haiti do need is own military force, to keep up with that structures, to protect and defend the constitution of the country but not the president, independant

    January 26, 2010 at 1:32 pm | Reply
  38. Dan

    For those of you inquiring about other countries aiding in the relief efforts.. I thought I should note Canada's efforts in the relief of Haiti.

    Canada is speeding up immigration processes for anyone directly effected by the earthquake applying for visa's and allowing temporary stays for people who already have family in Canada.

    They've also supplied over 100 tonnes of equipment and supplies (including medical) within the first week with more planned to head there shortly. At least two of our warships laden with supplies are there at any given time and are constantly running back for more.

    I've also read an article that along with the US's air-lifting orphans out of the country, Canada has also said they would be airlifting orphans to better facilities here in Canada over the next few weeks once it has been properly coordinated. I know that may seem a bit slow, but given the record keeping that has to happen to ensure these kids are properly taken care of.. it has to happen.

    January 26, 2010 at 1:35 pm | Reply
  39. Karnak

    Amanpour –
    Knows all, sees all, has all the answers; no human failings.
    Give me a break – get Amanpour off the air and out of print. She turns one fact into a mountain of opinion and as often as not even gets the fact wrong. Sometimes instant journalism is just instant trash.

    January 26, 2010 at 1:40 pm | Reply
  40. Dahlia

    I would personally donate $3 day to help a employ a bread (or rice) winner in a Haitian family. For example, the brother of the 24 year old young man who helped direct rescuers to his brother in the rubble of the Hotel Napoli has a wife and four children. I would be willing to sponsor that man to work for $3/day to support his family through this crisis, and I challenge others to do the same. Christianne, there needs to be a mechanism to set up this type of sponsorship.

    January 26, 2010 at 1:56 pm | Reply
  41. lex

    Why isn't Obama having the air force air lift the sick and injured Haitians to US Hospitals? I am sure Haiti does not have enough hospitals to properly take care of them.

    Medical services could be paid for from funds received by all the non-profits that have taken in millions. Perhaps the hospitals should be authorized to charge medicare or medicaid rates?

    January 26, 2010 at 2:00 pm | Reply
  42. alex

    so many times I heard... let the children leave Haiti to live temporary in other countries.
    do you really think it's a good idea?
    after their "vacation", where finally they discovered a life full of food, toys, schools and love... they will be dropped again in Haiti their poor country even with all the aid they won't see their country rised up so quickly.
    You give hope and then you kill them.
    If you really care of those children find a place in Haiti, even far from Pap and where they could live and go to school with international funds.
    Thank you,
    I care about Haiti
    Alex-Italy

    January 26, 2010 at 2:04 pm | Reply
  43. Jean

    I have a plan that I know would work in Haiti for building earthquake/hurricane resistant houses that are simple, relatively cheap, and need no major machinery.
    But, given my understanding of the scams that happened in New Orleans, and the way some companies would move into Haiti and use the people to get rich, I am not going to even consider telling anyone other than NGO's about these houses.

    Unfortunately I know that there will be some people who move in, take kids, take advantage of those most desperate, and I refuse to abet them in any way.

    January 26, 2010 at 2:16 pm | Reply
  44. Claire Bannerman

    I served in the US foreign service over the years and knew many folks posted to Haiti since 1970. I read that in 2008 a team of geologists spoke to the Haitian govt. about the fault line and the possibility of
    earthquake. Most US embassies have an "E&E" plan, emergency and evacuation.
    surely there has been discussion of what if? What if the earthquake hits and how do we handle it? What if communications totally break down?
    how do we handle it? What about med facilities? Are they able to handle it? I would think the US Ambassador would be urging Haitian
    govt. to address such perils....Why did UN have some 10,000 people on staff there? Is that not a signal of such peril? so many questions to review status of our US presence there with USAID and more. cb

    January 26, 2010 at 2:20 pm | Reply
  45. Jodi

    vinegrower:

    our philly newspaper has an entire article on the nations of the middle east that have helped. what a myth that the middle east does not contribute! the countries that have given in significant amounts (not to mention individuals within those nations) are...bahrain, the united arab emirates, turkey, iran, israel, jordan, kuwait, lebanon, qutar, palestine , morocco, syria.

    obviously the amounts they can help varies according to the wealth of their country.

    let us also not remember that haiti is a neighbor to the usa and we have a huge haitian-american population. my guess is that when knowledge of a region increases and when there is greater economic dependence on one another, the amount of giving increases (probably the middle east would respond in greater amounts if let's say tehran was hit by a major earthquake, just as probably asia responded in a more tangible way that than us to the tragedies in indonesia and burma).

    as far as the taliban contributing – i can't answer to that. but considering they are not considered a valid government, i'm not sure how or why they would. any more than the a fringe militaristic group in the usa would independently donate money to a foreign nation.

    January 26, 2010 at 2:22 pm | Reply
  46. Dave

    So many strong feelings posted here. I never expect these situations to gather such splintered reactions.

    gratitude, grieving, well wishers, credit seekers, blamers, doubters... it is a overwhelming.

    All honest, I'm sure, but so strong. I want to breathe deeply.

    January 26, 2010 at 2:42 pm | Reply
  47. Glynn

    Perhaps I don't grasp the enormity of post-earthquake bedlam in Haiti, but suggesting expatriation of small children for the common good seems like a frightening possibility. As one who has been a child, as one who is a father, I know with great certainty that as a child I would rather have walked with my parents in squalor than than to have been driven around in a Rolls Royce in some glittering but new and strange land; and as a father, parting with a toddling son or daughter would have broken my heart. I presume, perhaps naively, that that the bond between parent and child is a universal one. Setting up caring day-care centers, even in a tent, is a far preferable, and I hope reasonably attainable, alternative to child banishment.

    Now orphaned children - they present another situation , and the world must consider all options and do the best we can them.

    January 26, 2010 at 2:43 pm | Reply
  48. MILFORT MARC

    Haiti have nine departments, PORT-au-PRINCE is not even one, it is an arrondissement, an we have 41 arrondissements people, lets stop the BS and get to the point, i am watching that is all i can do now, watching... since when Preval, being trying to help HAITI, if I remember he was Aristide Vice President, to tell you brothers and sisters say with me: "MAY THE SPIRITS BLESS HAITI" for now most government official should loose they position. Lets start everything new, Preval all the ambassadors thanks for a job well done, if you could not change it than, there is no way they can now, check they bank account it is time to put all haitian government in lock down.
    those philosoph graduated in 2000, untill now can take charge of the new Haiti, we do have competant haitian to do the work, but they are in the street with nothing to do...

    January 26, 2010 at 2:47 pm | Reply
  49. Furzaflyin

    The U.S. always seems to be the "bad guy" for one reason or another. There are how many countries in the world? Latest estimate 195. If the Haitians are to be farmed out, why is the U.S. expected to give haven to them all? We re-homed our Katrina survivors and what happened? The crime rates in the host cities went through the roof. Texas suffered most of all. And is dealing, to this day, with the increase in crime.

    While I truly feel empathy for these victims of unspeakable horror, I would rather help them there than help them here.

    January 26, 2010 at 2:48 pm | Reply
  50. john h

    Haitians have greatly contributed to U.S. history.
    The city of Chicago was founded by a Haitian name Jean-Baptiste Point Du Sable
    The Civil Right Activist – W.E.B. Dubois is Haitian-American
    The designer for Dodge 300 (baby bently) Ralph Jean-Giles is Haitian American.
    Haitians soldiers also fought during the United States Independence War.

    January 26, 2010 at 2:50 pm | Reply
  51. Patrick

    I wonder why we aren't hearing about heroic relief efforts from the French who bespoiled Haiti for decades then dumped it. I wonder where Cuba is with aid since it's tried to make Haiti a communist country for decades. I wonder where all the other major countries are in sending aid and money. Hey, where are the Arabs with all their oil money? How much has Saudi Arabia spent to help out? Seems America is first to help and first too be blamed for all the evil in the world. Makes you wonder what would happen if we adopted the French posture of us first and to hell with the rest of the world. We would be a lot better off financially and fewer Americans would be dead on foreign battlefields. Think about it.

    January 26, 2010 at 3:00 pm | Reply
  52. dominique2010

    Amen Karnak.

    CNN has been part of the problem – reporting blocked roads when roads are open and exagerating security issues, thus stalling delivery of aid, especially medical aid. To this day, hospitals are still without supplies and people continue to die as a results. CNN is not asking the hard questions.

    January 26, 2010 at 3:11 pm | Reply
  53. CCG

    The U.S. needs to Annex Haiti for five years with a Special In-Charge Governor to oversee the construction of this country and its institutions with special immigrations laws in place to prevent the flooding of refugees into this country. Enough is enough with the taxpayer monies and UN funds of course going into this country with no results. Bottom line is Haiti needs our help and we are going to help them but they need to be helped with harsh conditions in place for their own sake and development.
    DESERT VOICE, you have the best idea so far on this blog!!!!

    January 26, 2010 at 3:14 pm | Reply
  54. JM

    They have lost so much and, although the outpouring of compassion and donations has been significant, that is undoubtedly not apparent to Haitians themselves who are hungry, thirsty, living in conditions that most of us could not handle, worried about their children, devastated over their losses, hurt and unsure of what the future holds. We need to first improve their immediate living conditions (giving them clean, safe, comfortable tent cities; providing ample food and water; providing sanitary conveniences; providing medical care and counseling, etc.); essentially, we need to treat them with dignity and compassion, not make them beg and scrounge for food and water. Then, we need to help them rebuild their country and society so that it benefits–and doesn't continue to defeat–them.

    All of the news stories I read/watch, seem to talk about the problems with food/water distribution as if they are insurmountable while every time I go into a grocery store, I am completely shamed at how much we have in light of their need.

    January 26, 2010 at 3:21 pm | Reply
  55. jim

    TyHouston and other commentators stating the obvious that Haiti has required international assistance most of their recent history;
    The U.S. can not allow a country so close to the U.S. mainland to go in to complete mahem. This would cause mass exodus of persons to Florida and assist the illegal drug organizations and terrorist's to thrive more than they are allready.

    January 26, 2010 at 3:31 pm | Reply
  56. Elizabeth Niemeyer

    I keep relating what we see in Haiti with what the situation was in European countries after WWII, how these countries were eventually rebuilt and how long it took ... after all, their infrastructure had also been severely damaged and, in Germany, if not mistaken, there was no central German government until 1949-50 – before then, if not mistaken, there was a coalition government comprised of US, France and England.

    I keep thinking that all the money being donated and supplies being sent will not serve their intended purpose unless some form of "central oversight" is established – an oversight which must include representatives of donor countries.

    Although I understand the initial emotional appeal of the "pictures" after the earthquake first occurred, for some time now I would have liked to hear more from the Haitian Government officials who have survived rather than see the same pictures of debris, wounded, dead, etc. over and over again. Those picutes and most CNN reporting – especially Dr. Gupta's – are nothing more than a source of irritation and frustration for me at this time.

    Let's get rolling on planning how to materially help these people on a long-term basis.

    January 26, 2010 at 3:35 pm | Reply
  57. Carmen Mills

    The long lines of wannabe-migrant Hattians will remain by the Immigration Depts, just so long as these people feel that their own homeland has little or nothing to offer them.

    I think the US and other global AID Donor organisations need to start some sort of ad-hoc "WORK /REBUILD HAITI FOR AID/FOOD" Programme now.

    As long as such a – practical – initiative is policed stringently, (...which means that the AID Workers THEMSELVES get warned-off / prevented / punished from dealing in "Victim Flesh" for "Donor Favours," as horrifically has been the case with way too many International so-called "Peacekeeping" efforts...) then I believe that the
    Haitian people could only benefit, both in the short and long term.

    They would have something to do on a daily basis; they would earn PRE-SET, DECENT WAGES for their labour; they would – as a result, begin not only to SEE, but also to FEEL that Haiti can...and IS...once again, becoming a PLACE TO CALL – THEIR – HOME.

    January 26, 2010 at 3:41 pm | Reply
  58. Dianne

    How many are aware that between 2001 – 2004 the USA stopped all aid to Haiti? How many are aware that there was a USA embargo on Haiti for years?

    Why did President Obama say: "You will not be forsaken, you will not be forgotten". Why? Because that is exactly what has happened in the past. How about some History lessons, CNN?

    It's time the media stopped bashing the Haitian government. In recent years Haiti was moving forward until the Hurricanes of 2008 & now this earthquake.

    And, as far as other nations, they're there, it's just not being reported. This is turning into a U.S. military propaganda machine with reports from the Pentagon, no less!

    Canada opened the airport at Jacmel, put in lighting on the runway, provided radar from a Canadian ship anchored nearby. The Jacmel airport is now open 24-hours a day, with 160 flights per day. Anyone hear that on CNN?

    January 26, 2010 at 3:56 pm | Reply
  59. Anthony Antonelli

    There are millions of construction workers in the US who are out of work,including myself.Is there way ,as a country, we could mobilize these workers and send them to Haiti to assist with the clean-up and rebuilding of that country ?

    January 26, 2010 at 4:01 pm | Reply
  60. Nicolas Estiverne

    Mrs. Amanpour:
    I saw your report on Tourism in Jacmel, starring Pierre Chauvet. What Mr. Chauvet failed to tell you is that "LABADIE" is a privately owned piece of Haiti. Royal Carribean pays no taxes to the Haitian government. The $6.00 per person on Board of the Ships pay the fee to Royal Carribean in order to get off the ship and go to the Beach and shop in Royal Carribean Shops. The Haitian people benefit "ZERO" from Labadie. I know what I am talking about because I researched it as a Candidate for President of Haiti in 1986 and 1989. Furthermore, Mr. Chauvet failed to tell you that He was one of the Principal people who refused to pay the Haitian Manufacturing Workers 200 Gourdes a week ($30.00 for 6 days of work). The Haitian Artists i. e. Musicians, get paid $10.00 for a full 3hrs of entertainment at Labadie. Mr. Chauvet believes he can pull a "FAST ONE" on the world. Transparency is the word. Let him show you the contract Haiti supposedly signed with Royal Carribean. It's a real HIGHWAY ROBBERY".

    January 26, 2010 at 4:27 pm | Reply
  61. God Knows

    GREAT Idea to pay the people to clean up their own city. Im pretty sure the Hatian people would be ecstatic to help build, clean up their own and still get paid for it. I think its a plus on both ends.

    January 26, 2010 at 4:29 pm | Reply
  62. joan

    I just saw a NY Times video report that the Haitian authorities refused to allow the US Navy medics from the USNS Comfort to land helicopters on that big beautiful vacant lawn in front of the centrally located Palace to take on severly wounded Haitians. 24 hours were lost while the Haitian government decided where would be a less conspicuous place to land !

    I think a good idea would be to hire hundreds of Haitians immediately to plant millions of trees in the hills that have been deforested. How difficult could it be to set up CCC style camps, pay these tree planters a decent wage and get going. I'm sure that there are plenty of tree planting crews in the US, Japan, China and Europe who could come to supèrvise and teach and then very soon turn this over to the Haitians themselves. Several years ago China had a massive tree planting effort that I believe has been very successful. France had NO net loss of trees since the Middle Ages until the terrible wind storm of about 10 years ago! The forests of the Northwest US are being re-planted constantly. I have not heard any discussion of this crucial employment possibility at all.
    Christiane...PLEASE ask this question!

    January 26, 2010 at 4:58 pm | Reply
  63. Michael R. Wimberly - Houston

    Christiane there is virtual World Wide agreement in magnum wishing the Haitian people well. But in all the discussions and comments made by the Politicians, News media and others no one has asked the QUESTION: Should Port au Prince be rebuilt on the same sight? If there is a better alternate sight? And if so should the city be moved?

    If my memory serve me right a University of Texas Geologist that had predicted this Quake showed a map on TV with the fault line running directly underneath the center of the city.

    January 26, 2010 at 5:18 pm | Reply
  64. Lissel Navarro

    It is amazing to read comments from people who know nothing about the history of Haiti and its people. I am a Haitian-American and I am disgusted with ignorant observations about Haiti. The U.S. must help Haiti because the truth be told it was the U.S. who encouraged the European powers to embargo Haiti and not trade with them when they won their independence from the French. It was Thomas Jefferson who feared that a viable Haiti, a Black Republic, would threaten the lucrative slave trade in the U.S. I grew up in Haiti in the 40s and 50s and it was a great place to grow up until the U.S. supported that murderous Francois Duvalier and his cronies. So why don't you go and study your history books before you decide to make narrow-minded, racist remarks about Haiti!

    January 26, 2010 at 5:34 pm | Reply
  65. clem Griffiths

    To all of those you helped or or planning to help sincere thanks. To my bothers and sisters in the region lets consider the comments , is it not time to dispel the myth that we are to poor to make a difference?

    I think we need to take action and push for regional leaders with a regional vision , this our backyard we need to save ourselves, if we put all those hands together we can make some " noise" .

    As individuals we are poor but collectively we can secure our region the alternative is unthinkable. We need a strategic plan for economic union , drain the Caribbean sea and pull our people together if need be but unite our people and by the way the USA is not the enemy .

    January 26, 2010 at 6:17 pm | Reply
  66. Arlene

    Thank you Stan & Ryan for reminding us that the Arab nations, Dubai, UAE, Princess Haya are helping Haiti. This is a global effort, as it should be.

    Haiti is an opportunity for Pres. Obama to earn or lose his credibility as Nobel Peace Prize winner...Can he direct US efforts in a peaceful, global, COOPERATIVE response working alongside the diverse nations. If the US is arrogant ...the tiger shows its stripes. If the US comes out of this situtation seen as a TEAM player, he has scored big time.

    January 26, 2010 at 6:20 pm | Reply
  67. texaslady2

    At the risk of sounding unkind, I would hope that one thing the world does for Haiti is to help to supply birth control and family planning information to the people. When someone starts talking about having 6, or 10, or 12 kids (or more) and they can't adequately feed, clothe, house or educate a fraction of that number, it is all too obvious what one of Haiti's biggest long term problems is: overpopulation!

    Yes, of course we should help with food, water, shelter, etc., but when did it become our sole responsibility to take care of everyone in need? We have 15 million unemployed Americans, millions more underemployed and barely making it, and around 50 million with no health insurance. How are we supposed to "rebuild" Haiti when we haven't even rebuilt New Orleans yet?

    Whatever we do, we should aim to get the Haitians involved in rebuilding their own country and put them to work there instead of allowing them to come here. They need to reconstruct their own society.

    January 26, 2010 at 7:16 pm | Reply
  68. guest 19

    What about the thousands of americans in need??? Jobs, Money... our economy is pitiful! i know what happen in Hati is a horendous but what about the USA. we seem to try and help everyone but can't help ourselves. yes, the US should help Hati in it's efforts to rebuild and restructure, but how much? spend some of "OUR" money at home. $836 billion in stimulis $??? come on. how many millions are we spending elsewhere that could contribute to our success. soon enough we will be looking for help from other nations to keep our necks above water. the United States should be look to as the "savior for all". we need to look after #1 first!!! then deal with the rest!

    January 26, 2010 at 9:21 pm | Reply
  69. V Wolsk, NYC

    Until we can predict and/or prevent earthquakes Haiti has no reliable future. We will rebuild and it will happen again perhaps soon. We need research in this area and the people may need to be relocated.

    January 26, 2010 at 9:53 pm | Reply
  70. Barb

    This country and I am sure as well as others are trying to come up with a way to predict earthquakes. Nothing so far has worked.

    We have not rebuilt New Orfleans to the level anywhere near it was is
    because out of sight=out of mind. The news agencies still do not really cover it. But fore the individual that posted that Haiti was doomed and should be moved – by your intrepretation we should have left New Orleans in destruction then too, as it sits below sea level.

    It is my hoped this time aoundthe news agencied will learn something and the only that seems to do that is CNN.

    Yes, put their people to work but they are going to need training and education, Not in the way that all of us think of it more as an elementary grade school type of education. Many if not closer to 50% of the population can neither read or write and just as many had no access to clean water.

    We have Internet access – that means as compared to that country we are kings and queens as we have a roof over our head, electricity,
    heat and/or air conditioning and we are able to put food on our tables as well as clean water and to top it all off we have indoor plumbing.

    Finger pointing or saying what whoever gave what is not productive.

    Rather, I believe the WORLD deserves an explanation as to WHY it has taken so long to get medial and other life saving supplies out of the airport.

    I agree with another that posted she was proud to be American. Let me state that as well.

    Barb

    January 26, 2010 at 11:18 pm | Reply
  71. Chantal

    Something must happen IMMEDIATELY to honor those who have passed away and are being dumped with NO respect. This is a situation that needs fixing immediately.

    January 27, 2010 at 1:09 am | Reply
  72. Michael R. Wimberly - Houston

    To Lissel Navarro who writes: "It was Thomas Jefferson who feared that a viable Haiti, a Black Republic, would threaten the lucrative slave trade in the U.S."

    Ms. Navarro, I suggest that your comment about Jefferson is only partially correct for Jefferson supported the abolition of the the slave trade which was prohibited by the US in 1807, yet he did fear that Blacks and Whites could not easily get along and he was fearful of the Haitian experience influencing Black American Slaves.

    Jefferson always supported abolition of Slavery, but he favored the immigration of American Blacks to Africa. According to Wikipedia "As President of the US Jefferson's position was a policy of neutrality regarding France's attempt to regain Haiti. Neutrality meant that war contraband would continue to flow to the blacks through usual U.S. merchant channels and the administration would refuse all French requests for assistance, credits, or loans. Jefferson's policy contributed to France's defeat in Saint Domingue. Thus concerns regarding the balance of power in the Caribbean and the "geopolitical and commercial implications" of Napoleon's plans influenced Jefferson to evolve his policy regarding Saint Domingue."

    Jefferson was torn about the prospect of good relations between Black's and Whites, yet he was in favor of Abolition and his policies as the US President could only be described as supportive of the Haitian experiment.

    January 27, 2010 at 3:16 am | Reply
  73. Stacey

    The "ti-credite" system is important to Haitian development. Haitian Art and mambo (peanut butter) come to mind.

    January 27, 2010 at 3:45 am | Reply
  74. Philly

    Dear Christine,
    In as much as i appreciate your reporting on Haiti...i really wonder if you could also air these--Where are all the aid funds to Haiti going?Most governments have personnaly donated on behalf of their countries....In scandinavia today..the Danish Govt.has donated over 70 million...now...can the whole world knows where on earth those money has gone to?Who has it?Who controls it?Because from the Dansih Govt,alone...every haitian is a millioner...and thats approxiamtaley 17.5million for each Haitian?
    Secondly,what about other countries donations?where have they been plunged?or is it just another pretense of helping?
    I would greatly be glad to receive answers to these,pls.
    Philly

    January 27, 2010 at 11:17 am | Reply
  75. Jean F. Colin

    HAITIANS WITHOUT BORDERS... HAITIANS WITHOUT BORDERS

    Subject: Volunteers from Haiti's National Security Force to assist US soldiers in Afghanistan.

    It could be Savannah all over again ....

    This is a suggestion for helping President Barack Obama politically.
    The Haitian people, in order to show its appreciation for the selfless
    relief effort by the US Army, Navy and Air Force in Haiti, would like to put together a group of volunteers –VNSs that would accompany the US soldiers in Afghanistan as an extra pair of eyes and ears in order to protect our American friends in their difficult mission in the war zone.
    3 Haitians Volunteers for every young US soldier in the Haiti Disaster Relief Operation. ...10,000 US marines in Haiti for 30,000 Haitian Volunteers to Afghanistan.

    Yes, we can!
    Together, we shall overcome!
    Today, we are all Haitians!

    January 27, 2010 at 2:15 pm | Reply
  76. WastedYears

    want to give haiti a future realistically?

    then the nations of the world should write off their debt, like venezuela did.

    and then, the us military should leave and not occupy them any further.

    January 27, 2010 at 2:59 pm | Reply
  77. Collens

    In response to those who belive the US is the only nation helping Haiti you should look north to your neighbor Canada. Both Canada and the US ran Hope for Haiti telethons on the same night with Canada having pledges of 25 million so far. The Canadian government has pledged 555 million and for every dollar an individual or corporation pledges to aid Haiti the Canadian government will match that. As well one cell phone campaign raised 1.4 million in one day and is still counting. As this is written Canada is hosting representatives of the US, France, the UN, the World Bank and the IMF are gathering in Canada for a conference that aims to map out the initial stages of the rebuilding process.
    Canada has also sent military personnel to Haiti along with with two medical ships. Canadian Forces personnel have established a solid foothold in Haiti by offering direct medical assistance to those who need it, just one week after arriving in the devastated nation.

    Capt. Art McDonald, Task Group Commander of Operation HESTIA which includes HMCS Athabaskan and HMCS Halifax, said the crews have set up hospitals and provided frontline medical assistance.

    Canada is not a pretense we are right at the forefront helping Haitians NOW.

    January 27, 2010 at 3:16 pm | Reply
  78. m.persechino

    The Haitian goverment needs to be out with the people.IF they can,t then the UN needs to step in .As this country needs help now.

    January 27, 2010 at 3:43 pm | Reply
  79. Lissel Navarro

    Dear Mr. Wimberly,

    I admired Thomas Jefferson very much and believed that he was one of the greatest Americans who ever lived. I traveled to Monticello to visit his home and came away impressed by his immense intellect. Yesterday, I read an article about Mr. Jefferson and the part he played in the history of Haiti and was deeply saddened. I am posting the link for this article which was written in The Root Online. It really says it all. We are all given choices to do what is right and he chose not to do it. He lacked the moral courage to do the right thing.

    http://www.theroot.com/views/curse-haiti

    January 27, 2010 at 6:06 pm | Reply
  80. Linda Salitros

    First I think there needs to be a woman in charge of the operations. Hillary should have stayed in Haiti and told Bill he could stay home and clean house. Seriously, the obvious differences in the male/female brain just point to the fact that women can turn on a dime, make adjustments where needed, allow for the unexpected, and have the stamina to carry on in the worst conditions. They also have the compassion to know that "rules and regs" don't always function well, especially in a disaster. They don't waste time in postering and other silliness men need.
    The Haitian government is useless at this point whether because they are themselves devastated, or that they have their own agenda. If the US is going to be there helping, they need to have some decision-making capabilities.

    January 27, 2010 at 6:22 pm | Reply
  81. pierce

    by the way (and my entire familoy agrees) that single donation you made in the day of the quake or the day after? It should not end there.
    This will take a sustained effort by all for the next several years. $20 a month is fair for a family to contribute. Haiti will needs lots of rebuilding, even without the quake damage.
    So did deep and dig often the next couple of years.

    January 27, 2010 at 7:33 pm | Reply
  82. bh

    I'm all for helping but I think we need to help our own first(USA)!!!!!!!!!!!!
    We need medical care for all americans before the illegals!!! Instead an illeagal gets free housing,free,education,free medical and never paid a dime towards taxes!!! Also this is american our language is english-not spanish I don't understand why we have to press 1 for english and listen to everything in spanish.I feel if you come to america you need to learn english,I feel we are catering to the illegals not americans!!!! If we(americans) went to another country they would not provide everything in english for us!!!! Please lets all get this changed where americans come first!!!!!!!!

    January 27, 2010 at 8:22 pm | Reply
  83. Clem Griffiths

    Could we suspend the Haitian Parliament or constitution for 10 years and run the country using an appointed senate drawn from Caribbean nations who would in turn be accountable to the Haitian people and the UN?

    This group would oversee reconstruction and ensure that a credible infrastructure emerged. This would include building codes, re-forestation, leadership training, etc.

    The existing government would co-exit during this period and at the end of the 10 year phase new elections would take place.

    The key deliverables would be schools, water, hydro, hospitals, roads, re-forestation, financial accountability and sustainable job creation.

    If we use conventional logic the obvious answer is NO however, these are desperate times.

    January 27, 2010 at 9:14 pm | Reply
  84. Pat Gardner

    Extreme home make-over would have a show and job for life if they went to Haiti....I'm not trying to be sarcastic.....I mean it!!

    January 27, 2010 at 9:38 pm | Reply
  85. StanW-California

    Put the people of Haiti to work!!! Wages of $3-$5/day is most appropriate. Reconstruction projects need to begin quickly using Haitian labor and foreign construction firms to design, engineer and actively manage projects. The very worst thing that can happen is for foreign governments to "give" billions to the Haiti government. The government is inept, corrupt and has already made $3 billion of our tax dollars vanish!!! Nothing to show for it!

    January 27, 2010 at 10:28 pm | Reply
  86. oldtroop

    i was in haiti (serving with the Army) after hurricane jeanne and the devastation was widespread and deep. much of haiti had little infrastructure before jeanne ... and none after. i was in the city of Gonaives, which had been crushed between incoming tidal waves and giant mudslides down from the mountains. but i was stunned to discover from the locals that years before, a US-flagged vessel offloaded tons of toxic waster offshore near the beach. the stuff contained no less than 10 carcinigens, including dioxin. my point is there i was feeling like we were being the active arm of the good samaritan, but the folk there were already angered by the toxic dump. i must say ... so was i. first we poison these poor people, then we come to their rescue. such ambiguity presents our nation as a dichotomy between evil and good. lastly, i thought president bill clinton was appointed UN Special Envoy to Haiti, but i heard little to nothing of attempts to get the country on its feet after disaster after disaster after disaster. as a postscript i must say that we are also blessed with wealthy entertainers - musicians and actors in particular, who responded faster than Congress to Haiti's newest disaster. i believe the common american people are good, and reflect a significant disparity from our nation's leaders, who seem greedy and hardheaded to party blinders and payoffs.

    January 27, 2010 at 11:07 pm | Reply
  87. diego

    how many billions will it take to help this nation become self sufficient? their illiritate rate is like 60% , they dont have the infrastructure, leadership or the enough professional people to rebuild. i dont think much is going to change ever in Haiti.

    January 28, 2010 at 8:06 pm | Reply
  88. sati marcus

    i think its time for all of us to show great love to the people of Haiti, in prayers, cash and kind.

    January 28, 2010 at 8:09 pm | Reply
  89. Jane

    Dan, Mari, et al. (I stopped reading, but I'm sure more of you wrote in about glorious Canada):

    Yeah, we get it, CANADA IS GREAT!

    You know, it's not the time or the place to plug one's own country. The US covers its efforts just as every other nation covers its efforts.

    I doubt Canadian TV is extolling the wondrous efforts of the US rescue.

    If anyone wants truly international coverage, then read every English language newspaper or a newspaper in every language that you know. Every country covers its own – that's just the way of the world.

    When Canada overcomes this pathological insecurity it has about bordering the US, the country will truly shine as it deserves internationally.

    Canada is a great nation. Stop reminding us and be truly proud of who you are. You are not the US and thank God for that.

    Keeping tally over how much people donate is just silly. Donate, do what you can – that's all that matters.

    And I'm from a Katrina city, have spent time in Haiti working on development, have Canadian ancestry and international journalism and work expereince and am very confident that my perspective is unique.

    January 28, 2010 at 8:28 pm | Reply
  90. SueBee

    I agree that we should help to pick the Haitians up and dust them off this one last time, and have given as much as I can afford to the Clinton Foundation. But why isn't anyone mentioning birth control and getting the population back down within sustainable limits for the size and resources of that country? Until this is accomplished and Haitians take responsibility for all the children that are conceived without any means of supporting them, all efforts to help will be untimately fruitless.

    Overpopulation breeds poverty and hunger and all these missionary hand outs of food and medicine for generations without making birth control available has led to the enormity of the present crisis. If you rewatch the footage closely of the first day or two after the quake, before people started going hungry for real, you will notice that most of the people and practically all of the children are a normal healthy body weight and all of them are well dressed, better dressed than many of us in the U.S.!

    If what we hear about the poverty level is true, I suspect the well dressed and fed well enough appearance of most of the population seen on TV is due to missionary handouts. As the population grows, they just continue handing out more and more (and constantly asking donors to fork over more and more) without ever demanding any accountability for the unchecked birth rate and the fact that more handouts are necessary every year while most of them just sit around because there are not enough jobs to go around.

    When you don't have anything to do and no money – there is always sex for entertainment, it's free! And guess what – with no birth control available there's going to be a lot more mouths to feed!

    I understand that there has been very little birth control available to those who want it, probably because the population is 80% Catholic and the Church suppresses it. Unless the Vatican wants to open their golden coffers and foot the entire bill for all these children being born without any means of support, they should stay out of it. Does anyone ever notice that the Church never ever says that it's wrong to conceive children that you have no way to feed and support???

    CONCEIVING CHILDREN YOU HAVE NO WAY TO FEED OR SUPPORT IS AN ACT OF VIOLENCE – PLAIN AND SIMPLE! It's voilence to the child who will suffer horribly and violence to the environment. It comes from a LACK of respect for life, not the other way around. It is the lesson the Haitians ultimately need to learn from this. If they don't, I guarantee the lesson will be repeated in some form and I doubt the rest of the world will want to continue enabling them the next time around.

    January 28, 2010 at 8:50 pm | Reply
  91. roger perkins

    Christine A HUGE THANK YOU RO ALL AT CNN FOR FIRST CLASS COVERAGE OF HAITI Can you tell me how we can make direct contact in HAITI on Ms HOTTELINE LOZAMA age 26 she Caught our attention with her HUGE GENUINE SMILE after being trapped in Supermarket in PETIONVILLE for 8 Nights We want to help in some smaaall way LOZAMA Directly Can you share the best agency in HAITI to find out Loxzama location since bein Rescued My Cell is 246 2534401 or Collect 246 426 7250 Ventnor Gardens #1 Rockley Barbados ,West Indies Can you send me an OFFICE Note OFFICE email address of yourself and Andeson Cooper

    I hope you can help bring some Joy to Lozama Hotteline I believe her home was destroyed If I could locate her employer or church or family
    LOZAMA Photo showed a worldwide SMILE taken by Francois MoriAP

    January 28, 2010 at 10:43 pm | Reply
  92. Jim

    I keep hearing tht haiti has to rebuild, that they did'nt have much to begin with. Why not send all those FEMA trailers used during hurricain Katrina over there. Those people would be so thankful, I think.

    January 29, 2010 at 12:20 am | Reply
  93. Lindsay

    We need to stop focusing on what other countries are doing to help Haiti and what we are doing and stop the game of who is donating/helping more. All that matters is that aid is getting to a country ravaged by natural disaster. People there need help and it shouldn't matter who's giving aid as long as they are receiving it. Many, many countries all around the world have donated to Haitians. Stop making it political and start making it about helping your fellow human beings.

    January 29, 2010 at 1:50 am | Reply
  94. EB

    Did Haiti ever have a future??? No electricity in Port au Prince, lack of running water this is everyday life in Haiti. The government not found this is nothing new the Haitian government never around. Haiti's president is not visible not providing direction. Haiti has a history of being a lawless society everyone for themselves. Who is accountable for the dead, just disposing bodies in mass graves this government cannot even provide proper burials. On a good day Haiti does not have the ability to keep accounts of births and death never mind this mass destruction. The Haitian government has never done anything for the people of Haiti. The rich remains rich and the poor is overlooked. The children of Haiti no future. What next the best thing would be to allow the US to rebuild Haiti. Don't give the Haitian government money history has shown Haitian government pockets cash for there own endeavors. This is an election year watch and see how this will play out. Baby Doc the best Haiti has ever had the last good president.
    Out of this mass destruction only two things can happen a good and better Haiti or the same Haiti before this mass destruction. Old government and the old regime cannot continue to rule Haiti. Its time for a new Haiti and a new government.

    January 29, 2010 at 4:35 am | Reply
  95. john strong

    Keep the reports coming, please. It is important that the world have an ongoing understanding of what is happening. Could we get a deeper look at the aid situation: distribution, warehousing, locations where need is greatest, etc. What has the TV appeal bought us ?
    Is there a Catholic Charities program at work? Where is the Red Cross? Are Islamic countries in the mix ? ........................yet another look at the work of our military would be helpful. Thanks for being there and keeping us informed.

    January 29, 2010 at 4:50 am | Reply
  96. Elisha Ratemo

    Christiane, what the people of haiti need is a big heart from the international community to help them rebuild. we need the World Bank and all the other humanitarian agencies to see the country on the fix line in the near future. US also should have a visa control for those getting out of Haiti because these are the same people running away who should help build. we have seen the hope in the people of Haiti and lets join them to rebuild again. thank you.

    January 29, 2010 at 6:39 am | Reply
  97. TimBob

    for the morons who want to know what Arab countries have given to the relief effort for Haiti, as of January 23 the following Arab countries hadgiven: Bahrain, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. The following Muslim countries had given: Bosnia-Herzegovina (it is not all Christian by the way), Indonesia, Iran, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan. Other non-Christian nations that had given to Haiti Relief include: Albania, Armenia, Bangladesh, Botswana, Cambodia, China, Dem. Rep. of Congo, Cyprus, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guyana, India, Israel (one of the first to help by the way), Japan, South Korea, Mauritius, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Singapore, Suriname, Taiwan, Thailand, Trinidad & Tobago, Turkey. Here are some nations who have not done a damn thing & I've added a $ sign by those countries flush with money: Algeria($), the Bahamas($), Bermuda($), Cayman Islands($), Costa Rica, Egypt($), Gibraltar, Greenland, Honduras, Hungary, Libya($), Malaysia, Malta, Oman($), Puerto Rico, Saudia Arabia($$$$), Syria ($), Tunisia($), Ukraine, British Virgin Islands($), U.S. Virgin Islands($), Yemen($).

    I am a proud American and a Christian. However, let's not kid ourselves. America did not invent generosity nor did Christian denominations. America has greater wealth and should do more. Because we are generous and give so much, it makes us look good. That just isn't the case though. With over 300 million people in the U.S., think of how much we could help if we all gave $10.00.

    There are 99 out of 247 nations on the earth who had contributed in some way to Haiti Relief as of January 23rd. Be careful before you start slinging arrows at nations, religious groups and ethnicities.

    January 29, 2010 at 9:42 am | Reply
  98. MsMHS

    Haiti has been a corrupt and poor third-world country for 100 years. There is no way that billions of dollars will help these people. They need to organize and set up a government as the US did 235 years ago. I would not send a nickel to Haiti; I'll continue to donate to local charities that help people right in my own neighborhood.

    January 29, 2010 at 2:13 pm | Reply
  99. Clem Griffiths

    Please do not give us a sounding board to simply sound off and nothing else , can we create a Pareto charts of all the comments and share same with the world and the politicians? Here is what I see emerging so far:
    1) America is generous but also needs to do more for its own.

    2) The Haitian government and culture cannot be left alone to manage these funds and the World deserves SMART results for the efforts being made there today.

    3) The new economy – de-globilization, etc- is going to take Canada, USA , Britain ,etc out of the picture , they will continue to respond in emergencies but at a smaller level and not over a long term as is being requested here therefore the rich vs poor mindset has to change the poor or poorer need to start planning to help themselves .

    January 29, 2010 at 2:33 pm | Reply
  100. W.N. Sanabria

    To Mike, who questioned your description of the C-130. The propellers on that aircraft are powered by jet engines. It's called a turboprop and is therefore a jet. In addition, it may not be as large as the C141 or the C5, but it is by almost any definition huge. Without checking Wikipedia I can assure you that it can carry over a hundred tons of cargo or fully equipped troops over very long distances. The name Hercules is very appropriate.

    January 29, 2010 at 5:21 pm | Reply
  101. John R

    I'm a Canadian perm res in Arizona. I wanted to chime it...Canada and several countries are indeed making a significant contributions. (It still burns me that Canadian Navy convoys to Katrina were never covered by US news). But how do we get the impression that this is mostly a US relief? For a couple of valid reasons: Canadian media, to use on example, is not seen anywhere outside Canada, and often times not prominently even in Canada. Also, American Navy assets responded first (as they always do with their presence in all the oceans around the world, a sometimes controversial subject, but very fortunate thing for those in Indonesia and Haiti, amongst other regions over the years), and deservedly should be credited for their 24hr response. This may not interest everyone here, but regarding Canadian Content laws: Canada's media laws limit but allow a lot of US programming into their country, but prevent any Canadian content from being broadcast in the US. Trust me, I know about this. I cannot listen to a hockey game on the internet, much less watch a CDN newscast. Canada is the only country in the world that I know of which does this. As long as CanCon laws have this ridiculous logic, your contributions will never be seen or recognized by anyone. That isn't the fault of the US.

    January 29, 2010 at 5:41 pm | Reply
  102. Judy

    The entire world is giving aid to the Haitian people for those of you that doubt !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.

    My question is why is their dyfunctional government (Haiti) and the UN not doing more for the people of Haiti? I understand that streets need to be cleaned and cleared, why not give the Haitian poeple some of the aid money and these poor people I am sure, would be willling to help clear up the streets and feel they are actually doing something for their countrymen/women. If the streets are clear could we get aid to them sooner?

    Since there are so many military forces in Haiti why can't the military from all countries handle the logistics for distribution? I am sure it would be handled in an orderly manner.

    I am appalled to see that all of the resources that are stored at the airport are just sitting on the tarmac in the hot sun. Won't the heat render the medicine ineffective? I also believe that the UN has warehouses full of food and water too what is happening with that?

    CNN's reporting has been invaluable in keeping the world up to date, thank you very much

    January 30, 2010 at 2:43 am | Reply
  103. mediscribes

    I think it is high time that the big donors who are leading from the front in helping the Haitians, should very well understand that this is only the begining of the rebuilding process. There is long way to go before we all can confidently say that Haiti has recovered from this tragedy. The aim should be provide continous asistance, well administered by an independent group that is commited to well being of the nation. Providing a temporary relief wont be enough. It should be a long drawn process that helps the Haitians to stand back on their feet and overcome the financial and emotional losses that nature had inflicted on them.

    January 30, 2010 at 5:41 am | Reply
  104. alibaba

    it is not the primary responsibility of the u.s.to be first and only aid donors to haiti , disqasters are the worlds collective responsibility, and pending damage potentials needed to be recognized and dealt with before , when china had a serious quake, how mmuch aid did america give ? flying one child to israel for surgery is just expected from the jewish state while many hundreds have died and/or suffering, organization of help for haiti amounts to the same lodgic as the catrina fiasco under bush's ineffeciency, but the world comes to one source first for hand outs = america !

    January 31, 2010 at 7:53 pm | Reply
  105. sapphire

    i think that Haiti needs water,food,medicine,and clothes to be like us.

    February 2, 2010 at 2:35 am | Reply
  106. vincent yag

    The United States helped tremendously,along with other nations.However in the coming months many people will still perish.
    Although this is troubling we must accept it as nature's way.We can only do our best,we are not God!

    February 13, 2010 at 10:38 pm | Reply
  107. Lisa

    To Lissel Navarro,

    How dare you say the US must help Haiti are you crazy. We do not owe Haiti anything. The US and other countries has sent billions of dollars to your country for years, just see no results in Haitai Haitians need to stay off their backs breeding children they are unable to take care of, stop rapping your women and children. Haitians are very ignorant and lazy people who think they can do whatever they want because other countries will help. But guess what, we are tired, until Haitians get off there butts and help themselves that country will not be rebuild. It will be better if they move to Africa. Why don't you and all the other Haitians that live in the US go back to Haiti and help rebuild.

    February 14, 2010 at 6:11 am | Reply
  108. Eadye Simpson

    It is nice to be able to hear the voice of wisdom in the midst of the many different cries for help from so many voices. Thank you.

    February 15, 2010 at 8:56 pm | Reply
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