Follow Christiane on social media:

On Twitter + Facebook + Instagram Amanpour producers on Twitter

What time is Amanpour on CNN?

Check showtimes to see when Amanpour is on CNN where you are. Or watch online.

Check showtimes to see when Amanpour is on CNN where you are. Or watch online.

And now your feedback

March 11th, 2010
10:10 PM ET
Christiane - all ears for the feedback.
Christiane – all ears for the feedback.

Many Amanpour viewers drew parallels between the earthquake in Haiti and the reported violence in Jos. Some believed the “problem” was “broader than religion” and endemic to the country as a whole and most placed the blame on Nigeria’s leaders, and referred in specific to former President, Olusegun Obasanjo. Several viewers described his eight years in term as “corruption at its best!” Hopelessness and desperation described most commentary about the renewed “crisis” in Jos.

What are your thoughts? Please share your thoughts with us! In addition, if you missed the show go to http://www.amanpour.com for more information.

Programming Comments

How long will religious crises continue unabated in nigeria while lies are being pedlled to cover up the truth? i am amazed by the claim that the root cause is "indigene-settler" dispute. i stand to disagree with that analysis. if we review most religious crises in northern nigeria, we see a particular ethnic group who are predominantly muslim wanting to impose themselves on others. there are many so-called settlers in jos (igbo, yoruba, etc, who have been in jos earlier than the hausas), but they have never rose up in arms against anybody. many of our homes & churches were burnt in the various crises in kano, bauchi, maiduguri, kaduna, etc. they refuse to give us land to rebuild the churches, cos it is "unislamic"...when it is convenient, they become indigenes, when it is not, they are settlers. *they call israelis settlers & palestinians "indigenes*". this is double standard. the late elkanemi of maiduguri while addressing a group of muslim/Christian leaders said on national television in hausa (nta news 9.00pm) on the 29th nov 2008, that the problem of jos had persisted since the era of the sardauna, cos the hausas want to take over the city. If these extremist tendencies are not checked nigeria may become another afghanistan and when it starts it will be difficult to curtail. let's stop deceiving ourselves (within and outside nigeria), that the crisis is due to indigene-settlership dispute, but rather a calculated attempt by a few elements to perpetuate their heinous schemes and they are inviting global jihadists to assist them!
Sam Nuhu
jos – Plateau state

FULL POST

Posted by
Filed under:  Feedback

Fatwa for Peace

March 11th, 2010
07:07 PM ET

Today we speak with Dr. Tahir ul-Qadri who has issued a 600-page fatwa against terrorism. Can it stop suicide bombings and encourage moderate Muslims to take a stand against terrorism? We want to launch a conversation how much influence you think a Fatwa has on different societies. So please read the English summary here and tell us what you think in our comment section below:

Posted by ,
Filed under:  1 • Islam

What we've covered. What we haven't...

March 11th, 2010
05:56 PM ET

We have a world map in our office and we put in a pin for the location of every story we cover. Check out our maps and tell us what stories and places you’d like to see covered on our program:














Posted by
Filed under:  1 • General

Nigerian violence fed by ethnic, economic issues, ex-president says

March 11th, 2010
03:10 PM ET

By Toms Evans; Sr. Writer, AMANPOUR.

(CNN) - Former Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo insisted Wednesday that this week's explosion of violence that claimed at least 200 lives is not driven by religious tensions between Christians and Muslims - but by ethnic, social, and economic problems.

In Sunday's violence near the central city of Jos, Christian villagers said a mob armed with guns, knives and machetes killed and burned at will, leaving a trail of death and destruction. The attack came in the same area that 150 Muslims were killed in January.

In an interview with CNN's Christiane Amanpour, Obasanjo said, "If you have one group or a community that has land that's been encroached upon by another community or even by itinerant cattle farmers, then the people who lay claim to the land will fight back."

"If there are job opportunities in an area, and persons believe they are indigenous to that area, and (are) not getting enough out of the jobs that are available, they will fight those who are getting the jobs," Obasanjo said.

Obasanjo said he's convinced the conflict in the oil-rich nation does not have religious roots, because Nigerian religious leaders have come together and deliberated on the problems in Jos, which lies on a faith-based fault-line between Muslim-dominated northern Nigeria and the mainly Christian south.

FULL POST

Posted by
Filed under:  1 • Nigeria

Tom's Take

March 11th, 2010
04:55 AM ET

Sr. Writer for Amanpour, Tom Evans, works on scripts with Christiane
Sr. Writer for Amanpour, Tom Evans, works on scripts with Christiane

On AMANPOUR. today, we looked at this week’s ethnic violence in Nigeria, which has only served to highlight the issues facing the country at a time when it is suffering on many other fronts as well - from problems such as corruption and unemployment. Today, protests took place in the capital, Abuja. The demonstrations are set against the ongoing power vacuum after the return to Nigeria of the ailing President Umaru Yar ‘Adua, after medical treatment in Saudi Arabia.

Tom Evans
Sr. Writer, AMANPOUR.

(CNN) – Nigeria’s former President Olusegun Obasanjo today declared that this week’s explosion of violence near the central city of Jos that claimed at least 200 lives is not driven by religious tensions between Christians and Muslims - but by ethnic, social, and economic problems.

In an interview with CNN’s Christiane Amanpour, Obasanjo said, “If you have one group or a community that has land that’s been encroached upon by another community or even by itinerant cattle farmers, then the people who lay claim to the land will fight back.”

“If there are job opportunities in an area, and persons believe they are indigenous to that area, and not getting enough out of the jobs that are available, they will fight those who are getting the jobs.”

FULL POST

Posted by
Filed under:  1 • Tom's Take