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Bucking the trend of the Arab Spring

July 12th, 2012
06:45 PM ET

By Mick Krever, CNN

Libya is just a few days out from its first election in decades. And Libya’s game-changing politician is already well-versed in the art of political speech.

“The only victorious party is the Libyan people,” said Mahmoud Jibril, whose National Forces Alliance seems poised to win the election.

Jibril served as Libya’s interim prime minister after Moammar Gadhafi was deposed last October after 42 years of iron-fisted rule.

“The Libyan people have managed to prove one thing: That they are the real decision maker. That the destiny of this country is not in the hands of an individual, of any political force or political party. It’s only in their hands. And this is very comforting to me.” FULL POST

Contraceptives for women worldwide / Global climate change

July 12th, 2012
12:03 PM ET

The latest full-length edition of Amanpour is online: Part1 Melinda Gates’ fight for contraceptives. The Gates Foundation's initiative to bring birth control to women in developing country. Part 2 Human connection to extreme weather A new study says manmade climate change significantly increase the odds of severe droughts and freakishly warm winters. Part 3 Bosnia’s burials continue Years after the conflict, burials continue in Bosnia.

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Melinda Gates' fight for contraceptives

Melinda Gates discusses her initiative to bring birth control to women in developing country.

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Human connection to extreme weather

A new study says manmade climate change significantly increase the odds of severe droughts and freakishly warm winters.

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Bosnia's burials continue

Years after the conflict, burials continue in Bosnia.


Filed under:  Christiane Amanpour • Latest Episode

What's next for Egypt?

What's next for Egypt?
Christiane Amanpour reporting in Cairo when the revolution began in 2011. She has just returned from another assignment, covering during the final round of Egyptian’s elections.
July 12th, 2012
11:38 AM ET

Q&A with Christiane Amanpour
By Samuel Burke

What’s next for Egypt?
I think what we’re seeing is a challenge by the new President Mohammed Morsy to the military and, frankly, what is considered to be the military’s hijacking of democracy. The idea of declaring invalid so many of the parliamentary elections, to basically dissolve parliament, is counter to a free electoral process. This week Morsy confronted the military in a quiet way by reconvening parliament just for one hour to try and get the parliamentary ball rolling again. The court again came out and said that their decree stood and that there needed to be new elections for a new parliament.

Will Morsy have a violent clash with the military?
My belief is that Morsy will not go toward a full-scale confrontation with the military. That’s in nobody’s interest. Most certainty not in his interest, nor in the interest of Egypt. His struggle is more likely to take place on the political chess-board, rather than by calling for protest in the streets. FULL POST


Filed under:  Christiane Amanpour