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Morsy adviser defends edicts as only choice

November 26th, 2012
06:10 PM ET

Egyptian judge on Morsy's edict

America's response to Morsy

Morsy adviser defends edicts

By Samuel Burke, CNN

A former aide to Egyptian President Mohamed Morsy said that no concession had been reached between Morsy and the country’s judges, despite a meeting Monday that appeared to have resulted in an agreement between the two sides.

“It’s not a compromise – it’s a clarification,” Jihad Haddad told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour on Monday.

Just days after Morsy received international acclaim for helping to broker a truce between Israel and Gaza militants, the Islamist leader has triggered angry demonstrations for an edict, issued Thursday, that effectively allows him to rule the country unchecked by the judicial system, for the next six months, or until a new constitution is finalized.

Haddad insisted that Morsy has tried to compromise with the judiciary, even looking for a “dignified way of promoting [the Prosecutor General] out of office,” but Morsy has been met with opposition from judges who are Mubarak appointees and loyalists. 

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Haddad said that Morsy has now clarified to the Supreme Judicial Council that his edict is, in part, an attempt to “protect the entity that is creating Egypt’s new constitution.” He hopes Morsy’s proclamation would prevent the judiciary from dissolving the constitutional assembly.

Haddad told Amanpour that Morsy’s edict does not make himself and his decisions immune from judicial oversight or investigational questioning, but insists that rather that it would only keep “presidential decrees” safe from judicial corruption – what he referred to as a “corrupt pocket of the judiciary.”

Haddad says the president’s edict was necessary to keep judges from nullifying presidential moves that are necessary for the country to move closer to democracy – things like writing a constitution, which has been difficult because of interference from judges.

An Egyptian judge told Amanpour, “There is no comprise,” Mohamed al-Zind said, claiming that the judicial branch in Egypt either has independent authority or it does not.

“When you talk about removing a prosecutor general, cementing a way to have a constitution in Egypt and to elect a parliament, this is exactly what he promised,” Haddad said. “It’s surprising when he acted on these promises some opposition forces in Egypt felt he did not have the right to do so, although he is the elected president of Egypt.”

Haddad also confirmed that the million-man march the Muslim Brotherhood had planned for Tuesday had been cancelled – for fear of violence. He added that “perhaps it can happen at a later date” when tensions pose less of a danger.

Critics: Morsy edict unifies opponents


Filed under:  Egypt • Latest Episode
soundoff (12 Responses)
  1. Anti Infidelphobia

    The Muslim Brotherhood agrees that there is no democracy in Islam.

    “It is Allah and not man who rules. Allah is the source of all authority, including legitimate political authority. Virtue, not freedom, is the highest value. Therefore, Allah’s law, not man’s, should govern the society."

    ~ Sayyid Qutb, Egyptian, Islamic cleric, author, educator, Islamist theorist, and leading member of the Muslim Brotherhood.

    November 26, 2012 at 6:27 pm | Reply
    • Marita

      I must have missed Allah's announcement about wanting Morsi to be the Supreme power here in Egypt.

      November 27, 2012 at 7:09 am | Reply
  2. Ol' Bob

    Meet the new boss
    Same as the old boss

    November 26, 2012 at 6:48 pm | Reply
  3. Thinker23

    It's not a coincident that there are 22 (TWENTY-TWO) Arab states and 0 (ZERO) Arab democracies.

    November 26, 2012 at 7:02 pm | Reply
  4. desert voice/troubledgoodangel

    Sayyid Qutb, you seem to make a lot of sense, provided that you regard Allah as a Christian God! We both are theologians, I a Catholic, and you a Moslem. And we both know, that there cannot be two gods! No matter how "convincing" your statement about "Allah's law" may appear, you still will have to convince me that you don't worship "Allah's law" that is different from the Christian Law of the One God! Because the laws of the One God are One! THEY CANNOT DIFFER! I would like to hear from you on that.

    November 26, 2012 at 7:11 pm | Reply
    • Thinker23

      There is, probably, only ONE God but "God's laws" were invented by us, humans. As a result, there are several sets of so called "God's laws". Not only are they different from each other but they change even within the same set.

      November 26, 2012 at 8:21 pm | Reply
    • Anti Infidelphobia

      I don't follow any religion. I reject them all.

      You do realize I am quoting someone?

      November 26, 2012 at 9:11 pm | Reply
  5. TK

    Freedom to choose to be a virtuous man or woman is of a higher moral value than forcing one to be virtuous. Free will is God's gift to mankind.

    November 26, 2012 at 7:14 pm | Reply
    • Marita

      Amen.

      November 27, 2012 at 7:11 am | Reply
  6. Marita

    It is always a puzzle to figure out why politicians lie because the truth always emerges and makes them look foolish. Who will ever believe anything else Haddad says?

    November 27, 2012 at 7:08 am | Reply
  7. dias1967

    I do not agree, look at http://english.ruvr.ru/2012_12_12/Democracy-is-Russia-s-only-choice-Putin/
    Best regards, Fredericka

    December 26, 2012 at 3:04 am | Reply
  8. Trudy

    It also explains partially, why diabetics have high cholesterol, high triglycerides,
    high blood pressure, glaucoma and cataracts, heart disease, low energy, anxiety and obesity.
    The main aim of diabetes management is to keep the following under control:
    . Originally grown in Southeast Asia, China, and Africa.

    April 10, 2014 at 5:11 pm | Reply

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