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Risking sexual assault to serve your country

January 31st, 2013
05:44 PM ET

Combating sexual assault in the military

WEB EXTRA: Rape in the military, Part 2


By Mick Krever, CNN

It is not every day that the man in charge of all of America’s Air Force calls a modest sergeant. Which is why Jennifer Smith was so surprised to get General Mark Welsh’s call.

Sgt. Smith had filed a formal complaint alleging sexual assault and harassment, which she said had gone on for years. When she finally revealed the assault to her superior officers, after years of keeping it a secret, she expected the Air Force to act.

“I was so caught off-guard by the fact that he called me, and considering who he is, and I know my place, I said, ‘Yes, sir. Well thank you for calling me.’”

“He just said that he was going to do the best that he could,” Smith told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour on Thursday.

But as far as Sgt. Smith is concerned, the phone call, and all the conversations with her superior officers that led up to it, have amounted to nothing.

“They know the case,” she said, “but as far as I’m concerned, nothing has been done.”

The fact that Smith reported the assault, one of several she suffered, was in itself a rarity.

According to the recent documentary “The Invisible War,” about rape in the military, 33% of sexual assaults are not reported because the victim’s superior officers is a friend of the assailant. And 25% are not reported because the superior officer is himself the assailant.

“I kind of didn’t tell anyone,” Sgt. Smith said. “I came back, went to work the next day like nothing happened, and buried it.”

Sgt. Smith said she knew many people who were assaulted. But for many like Smith, who is a 17-year-veteran of the Air Force, they feel like they have invested too much in their careers to jeopardize it by reporting assault.

Often, the harassment comes in a seemingly more benign, but just as destructive, form.

Sgt. Smith was compiling a report from files on a shared server when she came across a songbook with explicitly pornographic lyrics.

The page read, “F*** songs and Trash Tunes.”

“The reason that I didn’t come forward was because of stuff like this,” she said. “I just didn’t think that it would be taken care of or taken seriously.”

The pornography seemed like it was almost de rigueur for the Air Force.

But the event that truly changed Sgt. Smith happened while she was stationed in Balad, Iraq.

“I was assaulted by an Army personnel and he basically just grabbed and threw me up against the wall,” she said. “When I came back from Iraq I was different. That time was very different because it was so aggressive and it was so hostile.”

After some time back in the U.S., her husband convinced her that she needed to seek medical help, and come forward to her Air Force superiors. She was diagnosed with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Regarding her complaint she said, “I started at the lowest level of the chain, and went all the way to the top.”

Sgt. Smith is a 17-year veteran of the Air Force, and has come forward with her story just a few years shy of being able to retire with full pension and benefits.

“My father was in Vietnam,” Sgt. Smith told Amanpour. “And I remember coming home when I was a junior in high school and saying, ‘Dad, I think I want to join the army or the Marine Corps.’ And he said, ‘No, honey, we’re going to take you down to the Air Force recruiter, because you’ll be safe there.’”

CNN’s Juliet Fuisz produced this piece for television.


Filed under:  Christiane Amanpour • Latest Episode
soundoff (10 Responses)
  1. Connie Rife

    This is well known among ALL female veterans. I was in the Air Force in the mid 80's. I was raped, and so was almost every active duty female i've ever spoke with about this. One of my friends had told me of her gang rape in tech school. If you try to press charges kiss your "career", goodbye. Sometimes they get the wives too. At my first base two wives had brought charges only to see their husbands rank taken away. If you are female and military you'd better pay attention during the self defense classes; you are going to need them!

    February 1, 2013 at 5:39 pm | Reply
    • CM

      Women who do not report rape are just as wrong as the rapists, your not helping stop the cycle.

      February 12, 2013 at 10:45 pm | Reply
  2. Asiimwe N. Emmanuel

    I thought only bad things, human rights abuses and all the vices only happen in Africa as it is always portrayed. What are these so called civilized states going to preach and how are they going to judge our countries as crime and human rights abuse is a global disease? Do not be selective!

    February 2, 2013 at 5:02 am | Reply
  3. SHL Outreach

    If this has happened to you, or someone you know, you are not alone. Other military survivors have anonymously contacted DoD Safe Helpline (safehelpline.org) for support.

    February 4, 2013 at 3:21 pm | Reply
  4. Michael

    When there is no love...hmm things go wrong

    February 6, 2013 at 4:30 am | Reply
  5. Michael

    We all need the love of God,when this is absent,things go wrong,this is why we experience global warming,why re we tempting God,why?

    February 6, 2013 at 4:37 am | Reply
  6. khawjaimtiazalam

    What makes me laugh is the fact that aren;t there enough young men in the United States to fight for their Country. When you put unlike poles together they will attract each other. It works for human beings too. "Sorry mam, You asked for it". Let the men do their jobs and you do yours.

    February 9, 2013 at 2:24 am | Reply
  7. CM

    And you wonder why we do not want women in front line combat roles. Hm...... Derp

    February 12, 2013 at 10:45 pm | Reply
  8. Tracy

    Gotta love how nobody is blaming the rapists. Men, if you're so primitive that you can't control your urges and you rape someone, YOU shouldn't be serving. That goes the same for female-on-male rape, however it's far less common.

    February 13, 2013 at 1:06 pm | Reply
  9. Helen

    Two questions:
    1. Why would anyone want to go to war?
    2. Why does she keep saying "yes mam" when addressing Christiane?
    She has obviously been inculcated with subservience.
    Sad.

    March 8, 2013 at 11:35 pm | Reply

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