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Time for change at the top of the world?

April 22nd, 2014
03:18 PM ET

After the most deadly accident on Mt. Everest, there's a spotlight on the people who enable the mountaineering: Sherpas.

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soundoff (2 Responses)
  1. david miriti

    may the creator rest their souls in peace

    April 22, 2014 at 5:35 pm | Reply
  2. AC Sherpa

    "I like to share this tragedy on Everest April 18th, 2014 at 6:45am.17 Nepalese Mountaineer caught on avalanche, 14 died and 3 still missing."

    Dear all family and friends,

    Namaste,

    "This first things you hear is the roar sound, it's terrifying sound instantly recognizable.
    Your head jerks up, and you see the thundering cloud of ice blasting toward you.
    There's no time to do anything race to the nearest house – size block of ice dive for cover behind it."

    I would like to proposed ideas and actions to our countrymen who gave their lives to help the climbing communities around the world and who have left their families behind.

    Many of these dead Nepalese are Sherpa climbers who helped me reach the Top of the World in 2010 which I placed the first NRN flag . We should be very proud of these Nepali Sherpa climbers, who introduced Nepal around the world, who promoted the Nepali tourism industries. There are 600 Nepali trekking companies whose clients are supported by the Nepali Sherpa climbers, risking their own lives. I understand their of point view being a climber and what they have to go through during the 62 days expedition in Mt. Everest. Imagine, no shower, no families, limited food, cold weather, sleeping in tents while the wind blows all nights and days, and some of the nights, they cannot sleep. These Nepali Sherpa climbers are the HERO of our country, our country would not be the same without them.

    For example, look at our neighboring country, China, they have equal opportunity from the north site Tibet China but they have no men power like the Nepali Sherpa climbers. I love Nepal, I love our people and I truly believe that one day Nepal can become like Switzerland if we all work together!

    Today, over 15,000 Sherpas got together in Kathmandu for a moment of silence. I know some of the Sherpas, they have worked with me during my 2011 expedition. We want to reach out to their families more than ever now and to help them because they may not receive enough compensation from the Nepali insurance or the government. Also, we need to address some of the safety issues on Mt. Everest. Last year there were arguments between western climbers and the Sherpas regarding some safety issues but fortunately no one died. The lack of regulation and leadership can cause ambiguities and arguments. Of course, avalanches are not controllable but things could be improved and we need to remember that it is a risky mountain. We have lost talented and valuable people this time. Our prayers are with them and their families.

    In Kathmandu, the Sherpa Monastery Bhuddhnath's reaction is overwhelming and very sad for the families who have lost lives in the Mt. Everest expedition. Until today, according to International Sherpa Guides (ISG) information, 14 are dead and 3 are still missing. I am sad, I lost someone I knew for many years and my heart goes to their families. I will always remember those who supported me to succeed my seven summits climb on Mt. Everest in 2010 and my second trip to attempt 3 climbs within one season on Mt. Everest in 2011. I would not have been on top of the World without the Khumbu icefall Sherpa doctors and my Sherpa brothers.

    From this devastating tragedy in the history of Mt. Everest expeditions and the Nepalese's lives taken away, does the Nepali government has any plans to make changes? Can they set up meetings, create a panel by inviting Nepali climbers to provide solutions and ideas. Does my fellow NRN teams have any interest in helping these climbers’ families and safeguard the future of our people and this climbing industry?

    Let me contribute my expertise from traveling seven continents and climbing 7 highest mountains in the world as well as a business owner. I would like to work with NRN, NTB, NMA, NMGA, SPCC, TAAN, HAAN and NPS by contributing my knowledge. My resources and my ideas can be further explained personally. I would like to share my leadership skills when I get the responsibilities to do these duties. A well organized system regulated by a few selected Nepali companies can prevent future disasters, provides stability and safety, establish strong, better reputation for our country, hence increasing economic growth by attracting more foreigners who are interested in visiting, volunteering, investing in Nepal. It will create more jobs for the locals, with improved financial situation in the country, more people will have access to better education.

    The world is changing, yet in Nepal, the way we regulate and climb Mt. Everest have not change much. A lot of our old leaders are no longer in this field. We need new leadership and we need people who want to contribute, to renovate and to lead our nation’s tourism industry.

    This is the saddest, the most devastating and heart breaking event for all of us. We hope to support their families and love ones. I like to contribute $ 5,000 through 7 Summits Foundation if you are interested please visit http://www.7summitsfoundation.org and also you can pledge your contribution. Make sure you include your name and contact information. We will announce your pledge and
    the complete fundraised amount through 7 Summits Foundation by September 15th 2014.
    We will have a press release, we will handover this fund through the Nepali government to their families.

    April 24, 2014 at 2:30 am | Reply

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