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After stunning World Cup loss, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff pledges country will recover

July 10th, 2014
02:28 PM ET

By Mick Krever, CNN

It was a stunning loss for a country that views soccer as a religion.

If Brazil has been shell-shocked since its 7-1 rout by Germany in the semifinals of the World Cup, the President who staked so much on the Cup, Dilma Rousseff, pledged in an exclusive interview with Christiane Amanpour on Wednesday that the loss will not shake the national psyche.

“There is one hallmark and feature about football,” she told Amanpour at the presidential palace in Brasilia. “It is made of victories and defeats. That’s part and parcel of the game.”

“And being able to overcome defeat I think is the feature and hallmark of a major national team and of a great country.”

Brazil, like so many other middle-income countries around the world, has been engaged in the great project of modernization, and lifting millions out of poverty.

Rousseff has had a long education in Brazilian politics – first as a left-wing guerrilla battling Brazil’s military dictatorship, then as right-hand woman to the heavyweight of Brazilian politics, former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva.

Despite the country’s deep-seated passion for soccer, its move to host the World Cup was controversial. Brazilians across the country turned out in the streets to protest the vast sums the government spent on stadiums and how they were built.

Rousseff was booed and jeered as she watched the opening match pitting the host nation against Croatia.

Now as she gears up for re-election in October, can President Rousseff push forward with Brazil’s grand transformation?

‘My nightmares never got so bad’

It is one thing to lose; it is quite something else to lose like that.

President Rousseff told Amanpour, she never imagined her country facing such a crushing World Cup defeat.

“My nightmares never got so bad, Christiane,” she said. “They never went that far. As a supporter, of course, I am deeply sorry because I share the same sorrow of all supporters. But I also know that we are a country that has one very peculiar feature. We rise to the challenge of adversity.”

Brazil came into the match missing its two star players: captain and main defender, Thiago Silva, and star striker, Neymar.

“Not being a person that is deeply knowledgeable about football, I do believe that there was a significant effect,” Rousseff said.

“Two hundred million Brazilians view themselves as coaches and they all of course will weigh in, voice their opinions about the national team.”

But despite the drubbing, President Rousseff said Germany deserves to be congratulated.

“This is not a war, after all. It is just a game. And that is why football charms us all.”

“So yes, I will greet Angela Merkel, and I will tell the German Chancellor that, yes, her team did play very well. They are to be congratulated.”

An extraordinary journey: Rousseff’s struggle against dictatorship

Rousseff says she “never dreamed of being the president,” and her early life gives some clue why.

From 1964 to 1984, a military dictatorship ruled Brazil; Rousseff was an urban guerilla, fighting against that regime.

That experience, she told Amanpour, made her who she is today.

“As a young person, yes, I did struggle against the dictatorship. I am the product of that period in time, yes. And I’m very proud of the fact that I struggled and fought the dictatorship of the time.”

“It is very difficult to live under a dictatorship. Dictatorship limits your dreams. And when one has no right to express oneself or organize your efforts, any act of disagreement becomes an act of opposition under dictatorship.”

Rousseff felt the awful weight of that dictatorship when she was arrested in the 1970s and spent three years in jail, where she was frequently tortured.

“It was an experience – an experience where one learns that two things are necessary: Number one, to resist. And you realize that only you, yourself, can defeat yourself.”

“I’m not saying that it is easy to support, to tolerate, or to put up with torture. It is not easy to tolerate torture.”

“And you can only tolerate or put up with torture if you deliberately deceive yourself by telling yourself, well, a little bit more, yes, I can cope with that. I can also cope with a little bit more, a little bit more. And you deliberately mislead yourself, if you will, because you cannot allow torture to defeat you.”

“You cannot allow yourself to be contaminated by what torturers think of you.”

She endured, she told Amanpour, “the worst form of torture.”

“People were hung by their arms and legs on this piece of wood, as well as a lot of electric shock.”

“An act of torture and pain perpetrated by one upon someone else is unpardonable. It’s a barbaric act. Anyone who perpetrates torture has lost all human values, and has lost all the gains we as human beings have established as civilization gains ever since we left the caves.”

“I have never seen a torturing process that has not ultimately destroyed the institution that has engaged in torture,” she said.

Torture, she said, “has led me to live life in a more intensive way.”

“There’s just one way for torture not to contaminate you; you cannot allow it to develop anger or hatred towards those who perpetrated torture against you. You cannot allow that to go into your being.”

The victory against torture was not personal, against those who perpetrated it, she said, but much broader.

“It is a much broader victory because, in Brazil, nationwide, we have ultimately defeated the institutional establishment that engaged in torture. And we did so by building democracy.”

“In Brazil, we have this so-called lust, love – for democracy.”

Lifting up the country

Brazil, among the BRIC nations, is modernizing at breakneck pace.

Since 2003, Rousseff said, the country has lifted 36 million people out of poverty and brought 42 million into the middle class. But that process, of course, is never trouble-free.

The country’s growth-rate has slowed since the global economic crisis, yet she proudly promotes Brazil’s relatively low unemployment, plus government spending on infrastructure and health.

She reeled off a torrent of statistics on how much had been poured into these sectors.

“It is my belief that we will now move into a new development cycle in Brazil,” she said.

“As a country, we must wage a bet on education. Education can take care of two things: number one, you can ensure that those people who have improved their income and standards of living will be in a position to ensure continuity of those gains.

“And number two, we must move into the knowledge economy and value added economy.”

Amanpour asked just “how deep” the problem of corruption is.

Rousseff acknowledged Brazil, like many other developing nations suffers corrosive corruption.

“My entire life shows that I advocate zero tolerance towards corruption,” Rousseff said. “At the federal public service level, we have established the transparency or accountability web portal, where all government spending, all government purchases and procurement made by the federal government are shown or posted on the accountability web portal within less than 24 hours after the expenses are made.”

As for the police forces, Rousseff said it “is perhaps one of Brazil’s major challenges.”

Police in Brazil are responsible for around 2,000 deaths a year, according to Amnesty International – a disturbing statistic for a country with an authoritarian past.

“Fighting criminal activity cannot be conducted using the same methods that are used by the criminals themselves, and that is very often what happens.”

“The police service in Brazil are assigned to the state level governments as established under the federal constitution. I believe we may have to revisit that arrangement and revise that article of the constitution.”

Pride and politics

Brazil’s World Cup performance is important to President Rousseff not only as a matter of national pride, but as a matter of politics.

"If we had won,” one Brazilian told CNN’s Isa Soares in Rio de Janeiro, “the people would have forgotten all the money spent; at least now the realities are back in focus.”

The country saw widespread anger and protests against what many viewed as excessive spending on stadiums and infrastructure for the World Cup.

Many question the decision, for example, to build a stadium in Manaus, deep in Brazil’s rainforested interior; there is no football team to fill the stadium once the Cup has concluded.

Rousseff defended the decision.

“Manaus is a city that is not only close to the world’s largest tropical forest, but it is also in a region that is inhabited by twenty million Brazilians. And those twenty million Brazilians who live in that region do deserve a stadium that will stage all of the different activities that are usually conducted in any other stadium in South or Southeastern Brazil.”

Part of the solution, Rousseff said, is for Brazil to stop “exporting football players.”

“Exporting football players means that we give up the main attraction that can help stadiums be crowded with supporters. After all, what is the biggest attraction that a country like Brazil has to attract supporters to stadiums? Its football supporters and players.”

Rousseff, who is bidding for re-election this October, put a big emphasis on the World Cup as a chance for Brazil to prove itself on the world stage.

“One has to bear in mind that from all different aspects, the fact is that Brazil has organized and staged a World Cup which I do believe is one of the world's best World Cups. And that is largely due to the Brazilian people’s ability to offer and extend hospitality and welcome supporters from all over the world.”

‘Harsh women’ and ‘cute men’

Being a female president, Rousseff said, “is still viewed as a different fact in today’s world.”

“Woman who are political leaders are viewed as being harsh women, cold, surrounded by … cute men.”

“But I think both things are not true. As leaders – as female leaders, as presidents, or as chancellors – we are just women exercising our role as women.”

“It is quite certain and doubtless that women do know by definition that people are about feelings and emotions, in addition to thoughts and rationalities. I think that is a fundamental difference.”


Filed under:  Brazil • Christiane Amanpour • Latest Episode
soundoff (46 Responses)
  1. maria ferreira

    Did you like our president? I saw you smilling......I hope that you appreciated my country.

    July 10, 2014 at 2:33 pm | Reply
  2. Wellton Maximo

    I loved your interview. Incisive when necessary, but always elegant. A lesson for brazilian journalists.

    July 10, 2014 at 3:05 pm | Reply
  3. Eduardo Pocaterra

    A hypocrite who's government sells crowd control armament and tear gas to suppress and kill and torture young student protesters in neighboring country Venezuela against the brutal Dictatorship established there. Consider the loss of Brazil as a small doze of Karma for all the tears being shed across the border and with the help of Brazil.

    July 10, 2014 at 3:28 pm | Reply
    • Joey

      Brazil has many problems. Corruption, crime are the main factors holding Brazil back from doing well economically. The population is lazy and prefer living the good life over working and making something if themselves. This is clearly on display when you visit countries like Australia. Brazilians come in and take advantage of what the country has to offer yet offer nothing in return. 7th largest economy? What a joke

      July 15, 2014 at 1:32 pm | Reply
      • Ed

        In which country do you live if you in fact live in Brazil? "The population is lazy and prefer living the good life over working and making something if themselves." Please, make a visit to a big city like Sao Paulo or Rio where many people get up and leave early to go work all day long, spend hours in traffic, frequently standing up, and arrive late at home, worn out. Go and say in front of one of those Brazilians that he or she is lazy and lives a "good life", if you dare! Cheers!

        August 22, 2014 at 11:51 pm |
  4. Virginia Buzenas

    I am in ah of you I love your reporting, all your shows,and appearances. Thank you for doing a great job. Bless you and your family and stay safe. admire ring you always Virginia Buzenas

    July 10, 2014 at 5:01 pm | Reply
  5. sonsilv1

    Great interview. Thank you Amanpour to show the world the very competent, knowledgeable, secure and enthusiastic President Dilma Rousseff.

    July 10, 2014 at 5:39 pm | Reply
    • Leticia Correia de Lemos

      SonSilv1...With such a commente one would have serious doubts as to whether you live in Brazil................. !

      July 11, 2014 at 10:05 pm | Reply
      • Christopher Wright

        I do live in Brazil. I think Dilma is a pretty decent and upright figure who on her own will not be able to tear down a faceade of endemic corruption which goes way beyond politics. That does not mean I think she is tremendously competent but all is relative and for those who also living in Brazil (of course I am not Brazilian myself) answer this: Which opposition candidate would do any better?

        July 12, 2014 at 11:21 am |
  6. Cristiano

    For the sake the truth, I would like to inform all, around the world, that , nothing which this woman spoke in this interview is true. she is an inveterate liar , like her mentor , they've come blatantly lying to the world and to the Brazilian people. Her mentor Lula , is a professional in the art of lying and and she learned well the lesson. both are stupid idiots and Brazil do not deserve to be ruled by this rabble. all success that Brazil has achieved in the last decade in the economy is due to measures implemented under former President Fernando Henrique Cardoso.

    July 10, 2014 at 5:42 pm | Reply
    • maria ferreira

      How many public universities Fernando Henrique Cardoso did? Answer: none. The minimun salary was US$ 80,00. Now a day is US$ 400,00.
      The inflacion in 2002 = 12% ......today 6%.
      Nothing compares.........Sorry.

      July 10, 2014 at 7:26 pm | Reply
      • Ricardo

        well said.

        July 11, 2014 at 12:02 am |
      • Armando

        Current minimum wage IS NOT 400 US$ in Brazil, it is close to 310. The inflation rate in 2002 was 5.8%, NOT 12%. Lies and more lies, typical of people who defend the hypocrites in power in Brazil, members of Fidel Castro´s fan club. Nothing compares, indeed. PT never more!!!

        July 11, 2014 at 3:44 am |
      • Ed

        To Armando: Yes, inflation was above 12% in 2002 and interest rates above 20% bleeding the country, the IMF called the shots in Brazil during the cardoso goverment. Seems to me that beyond you not having knowledge of what went on during the cardoso goverment, you also have a reading comprehension problem.

        July 11, 2014 at 12:24 pm |
    • Ed

      Typical brazilian right wing neocon talk, no content, just hate!

      July 11, 2014 at 12:27 pm | Reply
      • lorraine silver

        CNN's figures:1000 rockets from Gaza to Israel... but for the Israel's Defence Force each of those rockets could have killed 1000x ??? Cannot CNN do that kind of arithmetic?. I am a CNN fan and I cannot believe the blindness to this part of the equation...lorraine

        July 14, 2014 at 12:33 pm |
    • JCCyC

      Ladies and gentlemen, I present you the Brazilian Teabaggers. Just as screwed up as the originals.

      July 11, 2014 at 4:53 pm | Reply
  7. lo

    She does not have what it takes to be president and a leader.

    July 10, 2014 at 8:31 pm | Reply
    • Osmar Santana

      What does it take in your view lo? Bending over (like we use to) to the IMF and the "washington consensus"?

      July 11, 2014 at 12:33 pm | Reply
  8. Eduardo

    Perfect and balanced interview. President Dilma is by far one of our best Presidents in the recent history. She has surpass Sarney, Collor, Fernando Henrique Cardoso (maybe the worst one) and Lula. She is integral and centered. In the last 12 years Brasil has experienced the major improvements in all sectors of our society, but pf course, all these steps must continue and being more strong. The actual opposition parties are all very weak and without a clear political program, they just talk, and talk, and our local media stream reverberates their lies, that's it. There is no content into our opposition politicians, they are all useless people, in terms of being legislators. So, it will be the best for Brasil that Ms. Rousseff stay as president for more four years, there is no other, and better choice.

    July 10, 2014 at 10:13 pm | Reply
  9. cacacojf

    She is a big shame for us, like all her party, they are destroying our democracy, her past is dark! she killed people, kidnapping your ambassador in brazil, stolen trucks and banks, she is a terrorist! we are near a civil war, and we need help! She is a terrorist, and i cant understand how she went in usa and not be arrested by your system, thats know everything about everthing! i cannot really understand! her party buying votes through social programs, all her data in this interview is false! we hate them and we will fight till the end!

    July 10, 2014 at 11:36 pm | Reply
    • Alex

      Although I didn't vote for her and agree that her party is highly corrupt- like so many others- what I consider to be a shame is the treatment she received during the WC opening ceremony. There's a right-wing magazine in Brazil (widely read by the elites) whose covers depict her and her party as the devil on Earth, the breeders of all the bad and wrong that have ever existed- #culpadopt. For people who share their view, Brazil was like one of the most developed countries in this planet before PT took power. According to their theory, until 2002, we were at the apex of human development, then, everything went downhill. I strongly believe that we could progress a lot more, if our wealthy and powerful stopped following GOP's antics.

      July 11, 2014 at 12:08 am | Reply
    • Heloisa silveira

      Sorry, but I do not agree with you. Please, come to reality and Open your eyes and see how our poor people's life hás changed these past 11 years, since Lula and Dilma implemented programmes for húnger combat. Wake up and do something good that can make a difference for our people.

      July 12, 2014 at 6:51 am | Reply
  10. Tatiana Souza

    Wonderful interview! Amanpour always great with amazing questions! I wish the best for Brazil!

    July 11, 2014 at 1:00 am | Reply
  11. Daniela

    It would have been nice if was true, but it isn't! Mr. Lula and mrs. Rousseff are the face of corruption and impunity. They disregard the Supreme Court like no one else has ever done, they are communist dictators hiding behind the Brazilian democracy. It is a shame that they can say whatever they want to the international community without any accountability. Ms. Ammanpour if you did your research you know the real reason why she went to jail it wasn't for fighting the dictatorship but for armed robery and kidnapping of an American embassador in Rio! This interview is just a beautiful delivery of a pile of rubbish. Truly sad!

    July 11, 2014 at 5:06 am | Reply
    • Osmar Santana

      Daniela, couldn't you come up with at least one true statement? I feel sorry for you, I really do!

      July 11, 2014 at 1:09 pm | Reply
      • Daniela

        Me too Osmar, I feel sorry for myself for you and our other 200 million compatriots and our offspring that are going to inherit a broken country! A country with one of the highest murderer rates in the whole world! If they really intended to lift people out of poverty they should have used the $ 20 billion and made every Brazilian citizen a millionaire, do the math! But the government does not have any money, tax payers money is not recreation/do what I please money! It is a shame how ignorant the people choose to be! And no I am not rich at all except for the grace of God!

        July 11, 2014 at 1:50 pm |
  12. Francisco Farias

    Unbelievable! How is that a CNN journalist lends itself to the role of serving as a propagandist to the most incompetent and corrupt president of Brazil! Dilma Rousseff was a terrorist who fought arms in hand to implement a communist dictatorship and remains committed to ending democracy in Brazil. Recently she created by decree Soviets in order to nullify the Legislature. And his government supports financially dictatorships around the world, especially anti-American ones like Cuba and Venezuela. And the journalist Christiana Amanpour believes when Rousseff says that will not tolerate corruption when her government is composed by the most corrupt politicians in Brazil, including José Sarney e Fernando Collor. Just to give you an idea, Mrs. Amanpour, a refinery it is building has a sobrepeço 1.000%, should cost U.S. $ 2 billion and is already 20! Excuse me the question, Mrs. Amanpour, but you consider yourself a journalist or a mere spokesman for dictadors?

    July 11, 2014 at 6:51 am | Reply
    • Leticia Correia de Lemos

      I wish Dilma Roussef and her government gets defeated in the next election for all the ROT they have struggled so much to hide to emerge…. for THE WORLD to see…

      July 11, 2014 at 10:34 pm | Reply
  13. troglod

    Lady Amanpour for comments, see how many people annoyed, angry with President Rousseff: Is the elite, who fear losing something when the poor out of absolute poverty.

    July 11, 2014 at 12:59 pm | Reply
  14. renato

    Roussef administration is being a great flop. I think democracy is not advancing under her government. Brazil is to be continued between the most inequal country in the world. Our country is the 6ª economy and 82ª on human development. Indeed, a rich country and poor people. They, Lula and her, arrived government promissing wealthy distribution and ruled such that Collor, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Sarney, in other words, they govern for rich people.

    July 11, 2014 at 1:58 pm | Reply
  15. Sheila Lins

    Mrs. Rousseff loves to be a victim every time is interviewed! She just does not tell, that she was arrested, but for being a communist, terrorist, bank robber and kidnapper! Even so, when she was arrested, not a single strand of her hair was pulled out, but she loves to say she had been tortured! We can't believe in a single word from this woman. She's the most incompetent president Brazil ever had. Even worse than Lula, her mentor!

    July 11, 2014 at 7:45 pm | Reply
    • Heloisa silveira

      To Sheila: Dilma is the most competent president Brazil ever had, if you like it or not!

      July 12, 2014 at 7:07 am | Reply
  16. SL

    Where did she find 20 million people in the Amazon forest? OMG, this woman not even know her own country!

    July 11, 2014 at 7:59 pm | Reply
    • Bruna

      The 2010 census stated that there were 15,864,454 people living in the North Region of Brazil, AKA the Amazon. I couldn't find the census of 2014. But I can imagine it could easily be near or a bit over the 20 million by now. You can google that information very easily and see it for yourself.

      July 12, 2014 at 12:55 am | Reply
  17. Enedino Benevides Neto

    You elegantly and concisely had the President voice inmost and current issues affecting Brazilians today. It is an honor to have a journalist you like in our country, especially in historic times such as this.

    July 11, 2014 at 11:15 pm | Reply
  18. Elaine Villaca

    Please, can anyone tell me who translated what Dilma Rousseff said on this interview. I'm Brazilian and she is not saying half of what it's been translated. She was a terrorist not a saint.

    July 12, 2014 at 6:22 am | Reply
  19. Armando

    To Ed:

    Table: average inflation Brazil (CPI) – by year

    average inflation inflation average inflation inflation
    CPI Brazil 2014 6.10 % CPI Brazil 2004 6.60 %
    CPI Brazil 2013 6.21 % CPI Brazil 2003 14.78 % first year of Lula as president
    CPI Brazil 2012 5.40 % CPI Brazil 2002 8.43 %
    CPI Brazil 2011 6.63 % CPI Brazil 2001 6.83 %
    CPI Brazil 2010 5.04 % CPI Brazil 2000 7.06 %
    CPI Brazil 2009 4.90 % CPI Brazil 1999 4.86 %
    CPI Brazil 2008 5.67 % CPI Brazil 1998 3.21 %
    CPI Brazil 2007 3.64 % CPI Brazil 1997 6.97 %
    CPI Brazil 2006 4.20 % CPI Brazil 1996 16.01 %
    CPI Brazil 2005 6.88 % CPI Brazil 1995 147.98 %

    July 12, 2014 at 8:16 am | Reply
  20. Marcos

    So that international readers know, PT, the political party of which Dilma is part, pay people to post positive comments on the web – the so-called MAV (mobilization in virtual environments). Therefore, any disproportionate praise of Dilma, Lula or PT should be take with a grain (I would say, 10pounds) of salt.

    July 12, 2014 at 2:42 pm | Reply
  21. Name* Manoel Bernardes da Fonseca Neto

    About Dilma Sorry I suppose you gave all questions to her before the interview.To understand Brasil you need to take a time and watch the astonishing brasilian film OLGA.To understand the apology 40mil people upward you need understand Bush's buying food here for American troops.To understand 3trilion to healthcare you need to understand corruption.Brazilian industry just a joke of 1957 level.
    lots of easy talk only.sorry amanpour.manoel

    July 12, 2014 at 3:54 pm | Reply
  22. Name*Maria Rivera

    If the president believes that living in a dictatorship it's not easy why she's creating (and financing)one, united with the worst ditactors of the the South America an Africa? Take a look in her Twitter and see her friends! And now, after losing prestigious for the elections she uses victimism remembering torture? What about remember she whas a comunist terrorist, she was a kidnaper, she was a theve, bank robber (keep beeing – now steeling all the country, with Lula gang).

    July 13, 2014 at 8:54 am | Reply
  23. Paul

    Those who listen our president may believe that our country is a marvelous place to live. It is not true. She is only a puppet , like Maduro in Venezuela.
    Christiane , unfortunately, you have forgot to ask her, what means to leave the poverty. It means a ridiculous salary that you can't practically do nothing with it. Our health service , education and security is a bad joke. People dying on the floor in dirty hospitals and in the public security we see it only in grand events like the world cup.
    Our justice is very slowly , then we don't have it. Corruption and the act of disguise of this government is monumental. She insists on lying , like his chief Lula . Doing this, day and night, they can fool the illiterate people and pick up millions of votes.

    July 13, 2014 at 9:52 am | Reply
  24. PAULO BRITTO

    APOSENTADOS BRASILEIROS ESTÃO SENDO LEVADOS A VIVER COM UMA POLITICA QUE REDUZ SEUS BENEFICIOS EM MAIS DE 70% DILMA NÃO REPRESENTA O POVO E SIM OS MISERAVEIS CORRUPTOS

    July 13, 2014 at 10:07 am | Reply
  25. Neil Turner

    As an American anthropologist that has been living in Brasil for the past seven years, I would like to just paint some very broad stokes with this brief comment. First, corruption along with high taxes and tariffs acts as a counter measure to whatever growth Brasil has experienced or will experience in the near future – the economy is already contracting. The federal authorities that are investing corruption are just as corrupt. The 42 million people that have been uplifted from poverty is a farce especially when you consider that the middle class begins with incomes starting at U$700-800 per month (perhaps, a middle-class for Brasilians but far short of any world class standards). The R$80 billion (...roughly about U$40 billion) that is being stolen each year by politicians is taken from social programs such as education, housing, health, day-car programs for children, infrastructure, security, etc. Privatization has made education too costly for those at the lower end of the social ladder and the poverty rates by organizations such as IBGE are fudged. Complacency and apathy have taken over because people believe that each new politician will only perpetuate "business as usual" so democracy is not working the way it should work. Brazilians have a lot to learn about democracy and capitalism. See Hilary Clinton's speech before the Congress when she stepped down from office. A very sobering account of Latin American leaders.

    July 13, 2014 at 4:22 pm | Reply
  26. Pedro Pimenta

    There is more torture today in Brazil than there was during the military regime:
    "(...) military justice officials reviewed at least 4,000 investigations into alleged incidents of bodily injury by police officers between January 2011 and July 2013. However, only 53 police officers were convicted for bodily injury committed during this period." by Human Rights Watch

    September 14, 2014 at 9:30 am | Reply
  27. Pedro Pimenta

    This is whom CNN and Amanpour are protecting:
    President Dilma Rousseff said on Tuesday that "greatly regretted" the attacks of the international coalition led by the United States against the terrorists of the Islamic State in Syria. In a news conference in New York, after the UN Climate Summit, a journalist posed the question to the president: "The United States began air strikes in Syria, where the government's position?" The answer was this: "I greatly regret that." (Veja Magazine, 23/09/2014)

    September 25, 2014 at 7:41 pm | Reply

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