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Check showtimes to see when Amanpour is on CNN where you are. Or watch online.

Beijing as perplexed as the West by Kim Jong Un’s disappearance

October 23rd, 2014
03:22 AM ET

By Madalena Araujo, CNN

Chinese authorities were just as bewildered by North Korean Kim Jong-Un’s mysterious absence from public life as the rest of the world, a former Chinese ambassador who now advises the Foreign Ministry told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour on Wednesday.

“We don't know what happened - he disappeared and then he appeared again. We don’t know what happened in the meantime,” Ambassador Wu Jianmin said with a laugh.

After remaining out of the spotlight for over a month, Kim Jong-Un made an equally mysterious reappearance and offered no explanation for his prolonged absence. Wu said he found the 32-year-old leader “quite mysterious”.

“The Chinese leader has had no direct contact with him apart from the vice president, Yuanchao. He went to Korea, he met with him, and Xi Jinping had no meeting since,” he said.

Wu has previously served as ambassador to France and the United Nations in Geneva. He now sits on an advisory panel for the foreign ministry, and is an associate at the London School of Economics' "IDEAS" program.

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Filed under:  China • Ebola • North Korea

Hong Kong demonstrators may scuttle democracy progress, says pro-Beijing legislator

October 7th, 2014
02:54 PM ET

By Mick Krever, CNN

By disrupting life in Hong Kong and rejecting Beijing’s ruling on how Hong Kong should be governed, pro-democracy demonstrators there may actually be scuttling progress on democracy, pro-Beijing Hong Kong legislator Regina Ip told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour on Tuesday.

“In terms of guarantee of personal freedoms and rights, we were free before we became democratic,” Ip said. “The democratic process only started getting under way in the 1980s, very late in the colonial era. And we've made a lot more progress since 1997.”

“I fully understand and sympathize with [the protesters’] aspirations. But they also need to recognize that our democratic model is laid down in the basic law.”

“We are not an independent country. We are part of one country.”

Students and pro-democracy activists clogged Hong Kong’s central business district through the end of last week, protesting a ruling by China that Hong Kong residents would be able to directly elect their chief executive, but only from a list of Beijing-approved candidates.

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Filed under:  China • Christiane Amanpour • Hong Kong • Latest Episode

Reading, writing and revolution

October 1st, 2014
02:32 PM ET

Across the world, students are using civil disobedience to further their agendas; in Hong Kong, they protest for democracy; in Colorado, they boycott classes to protest a new history curriculum.

Christiane Amanpour has the story.


Filed under:  China • Christiane Amanpour • Hong Kong • Imagine a World • Latest Episode • U.S. Politics

Chinese golden age at British Museum

October 1st, 2014
01:03 PM ET

Pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong have cast the world's uneasy gaze on China, but at the British Museum in London, a golden age is remembered.

Christiane Amanpour tour a news exhibition of Ming-era art with curator Jessica Harrison-Hall.

Click above to watch.


Filed under:  China • Christiane Amanpour • Latest Episode

Hong Kong standoff shows ‘lack of confidence’ in Beijing

September 30th, 2014
03:31 PM ET

By Mick Krever, CNN

The standoff between Beijing and Hong Kong over that territory’s right to choose its own leaders reflects “a lack of confidence on the part of Beijing leaders,” Anson Chan, who led Hong Kong during its transition from British to Chinese rule, told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour on Tuesday.

“Quite frankly, [China’s leaders] have a number of very formidable challenges on their plate, and the last thing they want to risk is any suggestion of instability and the loss of control over Hong Kong.”

“But there are also moderate voices in Beijing who realize the role that Hong Kong plays not only in sustainable economic growth in the mainland, but also helping our country modernize and come into the twenty-first century.”

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Filed under:  China • Christiane Amanpour • Hong Kong • Latest Episode

The Simpsons go to China

September 29th, 2014
03:45 PM ET

The images of massive protests in Hong Kong are nowhere to be seen in China, but a unique American form of subversion will soon be available there, streaming twenty-four hours a day.

For the first time, The Simpsons will be available for all Chinese to see. CNN's Christiane Amanpour has the story.


Filed under:  China • Christiane Amanpour • Hong Kong • Imagine a World • Latest Episode

China faces ‘most complicated’ protest movement since Tiananmen

September 29th, 2014
02:59 PM ET

By Mick Krever, CNN

In confronting thousands on the streets of Hong Kong demanding more democracy, China is facing “the most complicated outbreak of street unrest that China has faced since Tiananmen Square,” James Miles, China Editor for The Economist, told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour on Monday.

“It knows that the risks here are enormous,” he said. “The world’s eyes are watching Hong Kong.”

FULL POST


Filed under:  China • Christiane Amanpour • Hong Kong • Latest Episode

Hong Kong ‘Occupy’ activist digs in for the long-run: ‘It is a war,’ not a battle

September 29th, 2014
02:57 PM ET

By Mick Krever, CNN

Hong Kong’s democracy movement is peaceful and in it for the long-haul, Occupy Hong Kong Central leader Chan Kin Man told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour on Monday, warning Beijing that military intervention would be “very costly.”

“We do not know whether we can obtain our goal in the short run. But we shouldn’t look at a democracy movement as a battle. It is a war. As long as the spirit of democracy is alive, we are not, and we will not be defeated.”

Thousands of protesters packed the streets of Hong Kong on Monday to push Beijing to rescind its recent decision to maintain veto power over candidates for Hong Kong’s chief executive. Police cracked down on the protests overnight on Sunday, firing tear gas and pepper spray.

“The demonstration was in a very peaceful and orderly manner,” Chan said. “It is totally unacceptable for the police to use such a brutal force.”

FULL POST


Filed under:  China • Christiane Amanpour • Hong Kong • Latest Episode

Mo’ democracy for Hong Kong? No, says Mo

September 9th, 2014
09:22 AM ET

By Mick Krever, CNN

With a new decision by the Chinese government on how Hong Kong elects its leader, the dream of democracy “is nearly dead,” Hong Kong legislator and democracy activist Claudia Mo told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour on Monday.

What China has offered instead, Mo said, is a “sort of fake democracy.”

It was not too long ago that Hong Kong was not Chinese at all; in 1997, the United Kingdom handed control of the territory over to Beijing. The agreement the two powers then signed promised “a high degree of autonomy” and “universal suffrage” Hong Kong’s population.

Now, activists say, China has reneged on that agreement. The government last week said that while Hong Kong’s population will be able to directly elect their leader for the first time, the candidates for the position of chief executive must be approved by a committee of Communist Party leaders.

China’s decision must still be approved by Hong Kong’s legislative council before it goes into effect.

“I think China, Beijing, is essentially very insecure and paranoid, and they want to play tough with Hong Kong. And the message is ‘We don't care about Hong Kong anymore. Hong Kong is disposable.’ The supposed financial hub in Asia; the supposed cosmopolitan city, never mind. If you don't like it here, Hong Kong people, you can leave.’”

FULL POST


Filed under:  China • Christiane Amanpour • Hong Kong • Latest Episode

Tiananmen leader expected beating, but never bullets

June 4th, 2014
03:27 PM ET

By Mick Krever, CNN

The students who led China’s Tiananmen Square protests 25 years ago genuinely believed that success was a possibility – and though they foresaw a crackdown, they never expected the government to use live ammunition.

“We did expect some kind of crackdown. The logic of a mass movement is that you apply pressure and hope for your opponent to make the right choice,” Wu'er Kaixi, who was one of the main student protest leaders, told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour. “We never really expected real ammunition.”

Wednesday marks 25 years since the Chinese military’s bloody crackdown on Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, in which hundreds – perhaps thousands – of protesters were killed. The government has never acknowledged how many were killed.

June 4, 1989 was a “very dramatic night after seven dramatic weeks,” Wu’er said.

“We made very emotional demands. We went through hunger strikes. And one of the Chinese poets wrote that … the students moved the God but they failed to move the emperor.”

“Of course that time the square is in extreme emotional state,” Wu’er said. “But all the students there were almost ready, almost ready to sacrifice our lives.”

FULL POST


Filed under:  China • Christiane Amanpour • Latest Episode
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