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And now your feedback

April 26th, 2010
07:20 PM ET
Christiane - all ears for the feedback.
Christiane – all ears for the feedback.

Amanpour viewers felt that the “special relationship” between the U.S. and U.K. did the world “more harm than good.”  Others said the U.K. was not concerned about the U.S. as a whole although they thought these nations had to coexist amicably because of their very “deep political roots.” 

What are your thoughts? Please share your thoughts with us! In addition, if you missed the show go to http://amanpour.com  for more information.

Below, you will see some opinions from viewers like yourself. We would love to hear what you think.

 

Facebook comments

Charles Bauer

I only say Poodle !!!!!, in economy and social welfare : "Small" Britain is trying to stop the integration progress of Europe in the name of the USA and there allies in Israel. See what happens in Ireland by a billionaires advertising campaign, certainly paid with CIA money and stopped by an European Parliament delegation! Britains chance to survive as a great nation is to integrate into the EU !!!

Sanousi Sesay

We have seen how this “so called special relationship” has caused the world more harm than good. When US invaded Iraq on the false pretext of WMD, the UK was quick to blindly jump on US bandwagon and support the illegal invasion of Iraq because of the “so called special relation” Tony Blair even became US Foreign minister and travelled around the world rallying support from world leaders.

Pm Menon

I am not sure whether US really do care of UK -or- UK really do care about US. There is no doubt that there are deep cultural and political roots; but i have seen Brits not like the way Americans do. In daily life; there is so much negative thoughts about Americans in Europe; atleast Brits feel so !

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And now your feedback

April 8th, 2010
05:47 PM ET
Christiane - all ears for the feedback.
Christiane – all ears for the feedback.

The upcoming presidential elections in Sudan inspired the minority who spoke of hope for peace and disappointed the majority in the Amanpour audience, who felt there was “no political future.”  Russia continued to be discussed among others who fervently expressed their concern about the potential hazard that nuclear weapons represented to the world.  

What are your thoughts? Please share your thoughts with us! In addition, if you missed the show go to http://www.amanpour.com for more information.

Below, you will see some opinions from viewers like yourself. We would love to hear what you think.

Email Comments:

Hello Christiane
Let us call it Nuclear Week because USA and Russia are going to reduce their arsenal. This week can become a historical one if a humane decision would be made for the safety of all of the people and not only for a few. Nuclear weapon use has a extraterritorial consequence. If one use it in Iran 16 countries which are border with it would be affected. If it is used against Israil several countries are going to be affected. These two locations are presently the focus point of discussion. But the problem is general and not particular.  My suggestion is to create an international guard for nuclear weapons. The guards should come from non-nuclear nations!  Nuclear terrorism must be considered not only from Muslim, Kurd, Indians, Paks, Jews,  Arabs, Blacks,.. or any stereotype; it should  rather include: America outlaws, European Fascists and so on. The International Nuclear Guard should have full access to deposits of arms and control of its expansion. A UN body without VITO right must have control over it.  Only in case that such body is formed and accepted by all nations I can feel safe in this world.
Bahman
The Hague- Netherlands

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And now your feedback

April 8th, 2010
12:22 PM ET
Christiane - all ears for the feedback.
Christiane – all ears for the feedback.

The Amanpour audience passionately commented on the interview Christiane shared with Former Prime Minister Ayad Allawi, whose secular Iraqiya party won a two-seat majority in the March parliamentary elections.  Most viewers felt that Mr. Allawi’s expressed “hope” for a coalition government that could be formed quickly, was a “nice statement” but unfeasible to attain.  The majority wished for a peaceful outcome. 

What are your thoughts? Please share your thoughts with us! In addition, if you missed the show go to http://www.amanpour.com for more information.

Below, you will see some opinions from viewers like yourself. We would love to hear what you think.

Facebook Comments

Labaran Musa It does not matter who rules Iraqi, what matters is the ability for 'him'to deliver peace and security to the people of Iraqi. May God help Iraqi.

Kenneth Adedamola Ologbenla Let the government and the people of Iraq think about peace and stop this senseless killing of the innocent people. We need peace in the entire world.

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And now your feedback

April 6th, 2010
09:10 PM ET
Christiane - all ears for the feedback.
Christiane – all ears for the feedback.

The Amanpour audience candidly exchanged points of view regarding Russia’s effort to crush the roots of separatism. Reform was thought to be needed by most, while the minority felt this was not an “issue of reform” but “political propaganda.” Overall, people debated about individual ideologies, human rights and law enforcement and pointed that Russia’s rejection of democracy and capitalism after a decade, “drove” the country to its actual condition.

What are your thoughts? Please share your thoughts with us! In addition, if you missed the show go to http://www.amanpour.com for more information.

Below, you will see some opinions from viewers like yourself. We would love to hear what you think.

Facebook Comments

Dmitry Koublitsky
I'm afraid there's way too many people on both sides who're interested in keeping the conflict on.

Ahmed Azzamy
Reform is highly needed to manage to combat insurgency. Russians must do more in this regard.

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April 6th, 2010
01:25 AM ET
Christiane - all ears for the feedback.
Christiane – all ears for the feedback.

The Amanpour audience openly discussed some notorious world issues.  Chinese artist Ai Weiwei caused controversy and thought to be “disrespectful” to China according to some of the viewers.  Viewers felt that Weiwei “was lucky to be alive” according to the way he chose to continuously express himself.  Additionally, the conversation with actor Ben Affleck about Eastern Congo proved popular.  Viewers commented Congo needed public awareness.  Lastly, the Rwanda crisis continued to be of concern among the majority of viewers who felt President Paul Kagame “was the cause” of Rwanda’s “calamities.”  The minority thought Rwanda’s economy was recuperating and it would “come afloat eventually.”

What are your thoughts? Please share your thoughts with us! In addition, if you missed the show go to http://www.amanpour.com for more information.

Below, you will see some opinions from viewers like yourself. We would love to hear what you think.

Email Comments

Dear Ms Amanpour,
I caught that interview with Al Weiwei.  You know HE (Al Weiwei) is without TRUST & REPSECT for his country & really teaches people to mis-behave! Really he is lucky to be alive and I am on the side of China here! If online advertising companies and other outsiders continue to allow others to show dis-respect where trust can not grow,  then peace can not be expected,  because of the CODEPENDENCY  that Al Weiwei shows,  not free agency like he claims!!!!!  Using free agency to the point of violence is not what this country is about and neither is China!  And will lose China....  Trust & respect Al Weiwei needs to show his country!
Bye for now,
Deni

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April 3rd, 2010
02:39 AM ET
Christiane - all ears for the feedback.
Christiane – all ears for the feedback.

Rwandan President Paul Kagame’s statements on human rights provoked strong emotions on some among the Amanpour audience that participated through Email.  It was commented the government was at fault for Rwanda’s current “plunging economy.”  Additionally, the partial ban of the burqa in France generated commentary that fully supported this initiative.  All viewers that participated felt this was “fair.”  Twitter and Facebook viewers discussed the Serbia’s parliament massacre and while some thought that, the lawmaker’s apology was a “step toward healing” others disagreed and said “this wasn’t enough at all.”

What are your thoughts? Please share your thoughts with us! In addition, if you missed the show go to http://amanpour.com for more information.

Below, you will see some opinions from viewers like yourself. We would love to hear what you think.

Email Comments

Dear Amanpour,
I would like to comment about  the genocide of DRCongo. Regarding your conversation with Ben Affleck.The roots of all 5millions killed in the genocide of DRCongo is the actual administration of Rwanda. Paul Kagame is the saurce of what is going on in Congo.Yes there are some responsabilities to the congolese army,and fdlr, but the magor saurce is Paul Kagame.The east of congo will still in trouble if Kagame's administration has not yet changed it strategy and hypocritical behavior.
Charles, TX

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April 1st, 2010
10:32 PM ET
Christiane - all ears for the feedback.
Christiane – all ears for the feedback.

Amanpour viewers continued commenting on the partial ban of the burqa initiative in France. While the people that opposed to the ban felt that this initiative would strip Muslims of their “religious rights,” the supporters stated that outsiders settling in foreign countries should abide to the that country’s laws. Additionally, a European lawmaker declared, “Nobody could claim the right to look at others without being seen.” Overall, mixed commentary was received weighing religious and political beliefs for the most part.

What are your thoughts? Please share your thoughts with us! In addition, if you missed the show go to http://www.amanpour.com for more information.

Below, you will see some opinions from viewers like yourself. We would love to hear what you think.

Email Comments

Barone
If Europe is willing to take precedence of denying its own citizens from their basic right of freedom of worship, religion, dress-code or dietary preference; this will only work against its own interest & ultimately to its own demise. This european decision calls for all muslim countries to impose a dietary ban on pork, even a dress code banning shorts & bikinis or sun bathing in public places&total ban on alcohol for all europeans & christians visiting or living in the middle east. Supported by severe prison sentences for any offender. lts time for France to remember that it was these very sons of hijab wearing minorities that liberated europe from its Nazi enemies. Now these same very minorities will soon act & rise as bitter enemies of their own country.

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April 1st, 2010
02:02 AM ET
Christiane - all ears for the feedback.
Christiane – all ears for the feedback.

As France proceeded forward toward its partial ban on the burqa and a European lawmaker declared that the Muslim veil was a symbol of political Islam, Amanpour viewers’ emotions ran high.  While many avidly defended their posture based on religion, some thought this was a positive change.

What are your thoughts? Please share your thoughts with us! In addition, if you missed the show go to http://www.amanpour.com for more information.

Below, you will see some opinions from viewers like yourself. We would love to hear what you think.

EMAIL COMMENTS

Hi Ms Amanpour,
About the discussion that proposed banning of the Muslim veil in France, when I met my wife in Kuwait, she wore the traditional scarf (hijab) and the traditional women's robe. She was a practicioner of Islam and I didn't allow that to prevent me from getting to know her.  One of the reasons I went to Kuwait was in response to 911.  Being an American, I wanted to contribute towards the pursuit of those responsible.  So, I served as an armed security officer at a military base there.  However, despite my wife being a Muslim and the events of 911, I was able to remain open minded and respectful of Muslims as individuals which is how I judged my wife.  However, what makes this much more interesting is the fact I am an Atheist.  Nonetheless, because I judged my wife as an individual and not based on her religion, I proceeded with my intention to marry her which is what I did, less than a year later after my arrival in Kuwait.  And, I have no regrets til this day, almost 7 years later.  I share this with you to illustrate the fact people of different beliefs can function successfully in relationships as well as marriage.  My wife and I love each other for the things we do for each other and not our opposing faith or my lack thereof.  However, insofar as the burqua issue itself, having a security background, I do understand some of the concerns law enforcement may have.  Therefore, I believe through education, perhaps law enforcement, government, and religious leaders can come together to discuss those concerns and derive at ways of dealing with the issues short of banning or prohibiting a practitioner of Islam from wearing the traditional clothing or headdress.  In turn, the person who chooses to wear these articles should be understanding and willing to comply out of respect for the concern of their fellow citizens or host nation.  Of course, to accomplish this, they must be also willing to open their minds as well and listen objectively.
Sincerely,
S. Mitchell

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March 29th, 2010
09:30 PM ET
Christiane - all ears for the feedback.
Christiane – all ears for the feedback.

he Israeli Deputy Prime Minister Deputy’s statements played part in the discussions held among Amanpour viewers.  Optimism took the best of most, as some expressed “this conflict will never be resolved!”  A few continued hoping for peace.

What are your thoughts? Please share your thoughts with us! In addition, if you missed the show go to http://www.amanpour.com for more information.

Below, you will see some opinions from viewers like yourself. We would love to hear what you think.

EMAIL COMMENTS

Our country will be on the wrong side of history if it tries to divide Jerusalem and take the heart of the Holy City from the Jewish state. G-d Forbid! (And I mean that literally)
Larry S. Pollak
Columbus, Ohio

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March 25th, 2010
08:09 PM ET
Christiane - all ears for the feedback.
Christiane – all ears for the feedback.

After the Israeli Deputy Prime Minister Deputy shared with Amanpour that his government would take two years to expand the East Jerusalem settlements viewers agreed that the most hopeful outcome to most was peace.  Some voted against further Israeli expansion in East Jerusalem because it was felt it opposed peace resolution.

What are your thoughts? Please share your thoughts with us! In addition, if you missed the show go to http://www.amanpour.com for more information.

Below, you will see some opinions from viewers like yourself. We would love to hear what you think.

Facebook comments about the Israel plans to expand settlements in East Jerusalem

Dickson Igwe The problem with this issue is that it lies on a theological fault line. And like all controversial issues of religion, we will probably all be gone and this crisis will still be on going.

Dele Adegoke All we need is peace in the middle east. Further Israeli expansion in east Jerusalem may aggravate an already worsening situation.

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